Go on. Dive right in! 

St. Paul’s School structures its curriculum to not only provide core coursework but also to support a student’s sense of discovery by encouraging them to try new things or go deeper in areas of interest. You may arrive at SPS with a love for theater and then discover a new talent in building robots or creating a podcast. Or, you may come here with a desire to focus on math and find an opportunity to combine that interest with other disciplines. We are here to support you in your academic pursuits, help you build upon your joy for learning, and create a community where everyone is on different journeys … together. 

THE ARTS

Dance

DA110: Dance I

Term Course: 1 credit; Full Year: 3 credits

This fun and fast-paced studio-based course, formerly named Movement for Athletes, is geared toward athletes and beginner-level students looking to learn the fundamentals of dance technique while improving strength, flexibility, agility, stamina, body control and core stability. With a focus on proper alignment, muscle balance and injury prevention, this course draws upon several techniques including: core-strengthening pilates exercises, GYROKINESIS, yoga, modern dance, and ballet to improve balance and coordination, while also exploring musicality and rhythm. Basic anatomy will be introduced to develop an understanding of the function of each muscle group and how it pertains to movement.

DA240: Ballet II

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 3-credit sequence

Prerequisites: Training in classical ballet, placement class and permission of the Director of Dance.

This course teaches classical ballet techniques at the elementary level. Classes cover barre, center practice and the introduction and further study of pointe work. Students with prior dance training and permission from the Dance Director should enroll in Ballet II. Throughout the year, students may have visiting guest teachers from professional companies in disciplines ranging from Classical to Modern and Contemporary Techniques.

DA340: BALLET III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Dance.

This course teaches classical ballet techniques at the intermediate level. Classes will cover barre, center practice and pointe work. Students develop artistry and classical technique while working to-ward improving their strength and flexibility and classical technique. Students with a significant background in ballet who are interested in continuing their training at an intensive level will be placed in Ballet III by the Director of Dance. Throughout the year, students may have visiting guest teachers from professional companies in disciplines ranging from Classical Ballet to Modern and Contemporary Techniques.

DA440: BALLET IV

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Dance.

This course teaches classical ballet techniques at an advanced level. Classes cover barre, center practice and pointe work at the advanced level. Students develop artistry and classical technique while working toward improving their strength and flexibility and classical technique. Students with a significant background in ballet who are interested in continuing their training at an intensive level will be placed in Ballet IV by the Director of Dance. Membership in the SPS Ballet Company is a pre-requisite for placement at this level. Throughout the year, students may have visiting guest teachers from professional companies in disciplines ranging from Classical Ballet to Modern and Contemporary Techniques.

DA540: BALLET V

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Dance.

This course teaches classical ballet techniques at an advanced level. Classes cover barre, center practice and pointe work at the advanced level. Students develop artistry and classical technique while working toward improving their strength and flexibility and classical technique. Students with a significant background in ballet who are interested in continuing their training at an intensive level will be placed in Ballet V by the Director of Dance. Membership in the SPS Ballet Company is a pre-requisite for placement at this level. Throughout the year, students may have visiting guest teachers from professional companies in disciplines ranging from Classical Ballet to Modern and Contemporary Techniques.

Fine Arts

FC110: Animation

Winter Term: 1 credit

In Animation, students are introduced to the art of the moving image. Projects and techniques include stop-motion animation, hand-drawn animation and flash computer animation. With an emphasis on creativity, students will take their ideas through the full process from concept and storyboarding to building and drawing small sets to shooting to digitally rendering finished GIFs and videos. The course also teaches the history of the art form and incorporates viewing professional animations. Each term will conclude with a presentation of video work for the school in an evening screening.

FC110: Art of The Sketchbook

Fall or Spring Term: 1 credit

In this art appreciation course, students are in-troduced to historical studio practices using the sketchbook as an artist’s tool. The course surveys a broad range of artists and movements, begin-ning with the Renaissance period and leading up to contemporary practices. This course highlights the progression of recordkeeping and historical analysis through the act of journaling, collaging and drawing. Through studio art techniques such as bookmaking and plein air painting, students analyze their perspective and observation of the natural world to develop visual literacy. Online sources are used to facilitate historical research and image-sourcing needed for each projec

FC110: Computer Graphics Art With Computers

Fall Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Dance.

Students in this course learn to use scanning, drawing tablets, the digital camera and various software to create art using computers. Creativity and experimentation are emphasized. Students output their work in a variety of digital media, including large archival inkjet prints. Students in this course are strongly encouraged to continue with Computer Graphics: Web Design

FC110: Computer Graphics Web Design

Spring Term: 1 credit

Students in this course learn the basics of web design and create their own portfolio site as well as sites that are an art form in their own right. They also learn to maintain and remodel existing sites. Students also create new art pieces for use on their sites. Computer Graphics students are strongly encouraged to continue with Computer Graphics: Digital Imaging.

FC110: Ceramics I

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Ceramics I is a beginning course that focuses on the exploration and development of fundamental ceramic processes. Through hand-built and wheel-thrown projects, students design and create various ceramics artworks ranging from utilitarian items to sculptural works. In handbuilding, the focus is on pinch, coil and slab methods. In throwing, primary forms are explored. Basic glazing and firing techniques also are presented. Historical and contemporary examples, aesthetics and 3D design principles will be highlighted through demonstrations, lectures and tutorials. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fundamental aspects of three-dimensional form, including shape, texture and color to create original and expressive pieces

FC210: Ceramics II

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Ceramics I

Ceramics II and III are advanced courses that focus on the continued development of fundamental ceramic processes, with emphasis on advanced methods in wheel throwing. More complex technical problems are examined, including throwing of large forms, functional pottery and handbuilt sculpture. Advanced glazing and firing techniques also are presented. Historical and contemporary examples, aesthetics and 3D design principles will be highlighted through demonstrations, lectures and tutorials. Class projects will allow students to practice technique while developing a personal approach to material and process

FC240: Ceramics III

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Ceramics II

Ceramics II and III are advanced courses that focus on the continued development of fundamental ceramic processes, with emphasis on advanced methods in wheel throwing. More complex technical problems are examined, including throwing of large forms, functional pottery and handbuilt sculpture. Advanced glazing and firing techniques also are presented. Historical and contemporary examples, aesthetics and 3D design principles will be highlighted through demonstrations, lectures and tutorials. Class projects will allow students to practice technique while developing a personal approach to material and process.

FC350: Ceramics IV

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Ceramics III

Ceramics IV through VI are advanced-level ceramics courses for highly motivated ceramics students that build upon advanced technical skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with clay as a sculptural or utilitarian medium. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works

FC380: Ceramics V

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Ceramics IV

Ceramics IV through VI are advanced-level ceramics courses for highly motivated ceramics students that build upon advanced technical skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with clay as a sculptural or utilitarian medium. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works

FC450: Ceramics VI

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Ceramics V

Ceramics IV through VI are advanced-level ceramics courses for highly motivated ceramics students that build upon advanced technical skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with clay as a sculptural or utilitarian medium. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works.

FD110: Drawing I

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This introductory-level course focuses on the basic techniques of drawing. Beginning with the fundamentals of drawing through the use of pencil, ink, marker, pastels, charcoal and Conté crayon, the class then transitions to similar projects in watercolor and oil painting. Elements of design are introduced and reinforced in this course. The course is designed for students from all levels of experience and serves as a prerequisite for all subsequent drawing courses.

FD210: Drawing II

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Drawing II

Drawing II and III represent the second and third terms in our Drawing sequence and focus on skills via more extensive, conceptual works. Students develop a thematic series of works around one or two subjects, including landscape, portraiture, still life and abstraction. Assignments are more independent in nature and individualized to the requirements of each student. Studio work is informed by art history and master-artist references

FD240: Drawing III

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Drawing II

Drawing II and III represent the second and third terms in our Drawing sequence and focus on skills via more extensive, conceptual works. Students develop a thematic series of works around one or two subjects, including landscape, portraiture, still life and abstraction. Assignments are more independent in nature and individualized to the requirements of each student. Studio work is informed by art history and masterartist references.

FD350: Drawing IV

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Drawing III

Drawing IV through VI are advanced-level courses for highly motivated drawing students that build upon basic drawing and compositional skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular drawing medium, including graphite, charcoal, pastel, pen and ink, Conté crayon or other drawing media. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works. Subjects include landscape, portraiture, still life, illustration and abstraction

FD380: Drawing V

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Drawing IV

Drawing IV through VI are advanced-level courses for highly motivated drawing students that build upon basic drawing and compositional skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular drawing medium, including graphite, charcoal, pastel, pen and ink, Conté crayon or other drawing media. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works. Subjects include landscape, portraiture, still life, illustration and abstraction.

FD450: Drawing VI

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Drawing V

Drawing IV through VI are advanced-level courses for highly motivated drawing students that build upon basic drawing and compositional skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular drawing medium, including graphite, charcoal, pastel, pen and ink, Conté crayon or other drawing media. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works. Subjects include landscape, portraiture, still life, illustration and abstraction.

FP110: Painting I

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This introductory level course focuses on the basic techniques of painting. Beginning with transparent watercolor, students work toward an introduction to oil painting through landscape and still life. Elements of design and color theory are introduced and reinforced. The course is designed for students from all levels of experience and serves as a prerequisite for all subsequent painting courses.

FP210: Painting II

Fall, Winter or Spring term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Painting I

Painting II and III build on the basic techniques introduced in Painting 1 and develop those skills through a thematic series of works. Various land-cape techniques and conceptual projects are introduced. Assignments are more independent in nature and individualized to the requirements of each student.

FP240: Painting III

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Painting II

Painting II and III build on the basic techniques introduced in Painting 1 and develop those skills through a thematic series of works. Various landscape techniques and conceptual projects are introduced. Assignments are more independent in nature and individualized to the requirements of each student.

FP350: Painting IV

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Painting III

Painting IV through VI are advanced-level courses for highly motivated painting students that builds upon basic painting and compositional skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular painting medium, including watercolors, acrylics, oils and/or encaustics. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works. Subjects include landscape painting in “plein air,” portraiture, still life and abstraction.

FP380: Painting V

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Painting IV

Painting IV through VI are advanced-level courses for highly motivated painting students that builds upon basic painting and compositional skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular painting medium, including watercolors, acrylics, oils and/or encaustics. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works. Subjects include landscape painting in “plein air,” portraiture, still life and abstraction.

FP450: Painting VI

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Painting V

Painting IV through VI are advanced-level courses for highly motivated painting students that builds upon basic painting and compositional skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular painting medium, including watercolors, acrylics, oils and/or encaustics. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works. Subjects include landscape painting in “plein air,” portraiture, still life and abstraction.

FA480: Advanced Portfolio Drawing and Painting

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: A combination of six terms in Drawing or Painting. Available only to Sixth Formers or Fifth Formers with departmental approval.

This highly rigorous program provides serious and dedicated advanced-level drawing and painting students with the opportunity to prepare an Advanced Placement portfolio to be submitted to the College Board. Throughout this yearlong course, students develop a comprehensive body of work that fulfills the Advanced Placement portfolio requirements of breadth, concentration and quality; students also organize an exhibition of their work

FG110: Glass I

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Glass 1 is a beginning course for students who want to work with glass as a sculptural medium. Students will be introduced to hot glass, glass fusing, glass casting and stained glass construction. Projects will focus on the three-dimensional elements and principles of art and design, while historical and contemporary examples of glass are studied. Students will learn how to manipulate hot glass, cut and grind glass, solder and create plaster molds. The course provides the opportunity for students to explore possibilities of glass in the studio and hot shop

FG210: Glass II

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Glass I

This course introduces the basics of manipulating hot glass through the use of a blowpipe and hand tools. Students learn how to gather glass from the furnace and shape it using hand tools at the glass-blowing bench. Using heat, gravity and centrifugal force, students create vessels such as tumblers, bowls and vases. Students also are introduced to basic color applications as well as grinding and polishing techniques.Students study historical and contemporary examples of blown glass, as well as the artists involved with glass. Emphasis is given to developing hand skills, team work, creative thinking, self-expression and shop safet

FG240: Glass III

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Glass II

This course continues with the basics of manipulating hot glass through the use of a blowpipe and hand tools. Students learn how to gather glass from the furnace and shape it using hand tools at the glassblowing bench. Using heat, gravity and centrifugal force, students create vessels such as tumblers, bowls and vases. Students also are introduced to basic color applications and grinding and polishing techniques. Students study historical and contemporary examples of blown glass, as well as the artists involved with glass. Emphasis is given to developing hand skills, team work, creative thinking, self-expression and shop safety

FT110: Introduction to Photography

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

An introductory photography course designed for students with little or no previous photography experience, this course introduces the principles of photography through a blend of traditional and digital processes. The main objective is to teach students to see light rather than things. Students gain foundational understanding of the 35mm camera, black-and-white film, digital scanning, Adobe Photoshop and digital printing. Students

must have access to a fully manual 35mm camera or may borrow one from the Department. (Arrangements can be made with the photography instructor for borrowing cameras.) Each photography course is concerned with the aesthetics, history and practice of this light-generated form of art. Additionally, productive critique procedures are cultivated.

FT210: Black and White Photography

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography

Students further develop black-and-white photography concepts introduced in Introduction to Photography, this time with a focus on people and the body. The Zone Simple System, studio lighting and other intermediate-level techniques are explored, and several historical and contemporary artists are discussed. An emphasis is placed on portraiture and self-portraiture and the exploration of gesture and meaning. Additionally, productive critique procedures are cultivated and the collaborative studio dynamic explored. Students should be highly motivated and have strong critical skills in all intermediate- and advanced-level photography courses. Students must have access to a fully manual 35mm camera or may borrow one from the Department

FT240: Photography: Color

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Black and White Photography

Students continue to develop photographic vocabulary and vision while building upon intermediate-level black-and-white photography techniques. They also are introduced to computer colorization, color photography, color digital printing and basic computer image manipulation. Emphasis will be placed on developing narratives using photographic imagery. Students must have access to a fully manual 35mm camera or may borrow one from the Department

FT480: Advanced Portfolio Photograhpy

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: A combination of six terms in Photography or Printmaking. Available only to Sixth Formers or Fifth Formers with departmental permission

This course provides advanced photography students with the opportunity to explore their unique personal vision with the aim of producing a comprehensive Advanced Placement portfolio to present to the College Board. Students in this yearlong course will develop in-depth work in a concentrated theme and explore the breadth of the medium through experimentation with alternative themes and processes. Students also will organize an exhibition of their work. Students must have access to a fully manual 35mm camera or may borrow one from the Department

FA110 Printmaking I

Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

The printmaking courses 1-3 introduce students to various printmaking methods and media in a fast-paced, collaborative studio. With a heavy focus on experimentation, originality and message, students explore multiplicity, image reversal, design principles, color and mark-making through both hand-printed and press-printed techniques. Students develop technical ability and aesthetic skills through instruction in relief printing, em-bossing, intaglio, monotype, bookmaking, screen printing, Riso duplication and Xerox. This studio course delves into the rich, democratic history of print media by discussing its roots in publishing and politically engaged and public artworks, and continuing into contemporary print cultures and industrial applications. No drawing experience necessary

FA210: Printmaking II

Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Printmaking I

The printmaking courses 1-3 introduce students to various printmaking methods and media in a fast-paced, collaborative studio. With a heavy focus on experimentation, originality and message, students explore multiplicity, image reversal, design principles, color and mark-making through both hand-printed and press-printed techniques. Students develop technical ability and aesthetic skills through instruction in relief printing, em-bossing, intaglio, monotype, bookmaking, screen printing, Riso duplication and Xerox. This studio course delves into the rich, democratic history of print media by discussing its roots in publishing and politically engaged and public artworks, and continuing into contemporary print cultures and industrial applications. No drawing experience necessary

FA240: Printmaking III

Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Printmaking II

The printmaking courses 1-3 introduce students to various printmaking methods and media in a fast-paced, collaborative studio. With a heavy focus on experimentation, originality and message, students explore multiplicity, image reversal, design principles, color and mark-making through both hand-printed and press-printed techniques. Students develop technical ability and aesthetic skills through instruction in relief printing, em-bossing, intaglio, monotype, bookmaking, screen printing, Riso duplication and Xerox. This studio course delves into the rich, democratic history of print media by discussing its roots in publishing and politically engaged and public artworks, and continuing into contemporary print cultures and industrial applications. No drawing experience necessary

FS110: Sculpture I

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Sculpture 1 is a beginning course for students who want to explore and work in three-dimensional art forms. Students will be introduced to the 3-D elements and principles of art and design. Students will consider how materials, processes and ideas can be used to make work that involves space and form. The class format will include image presentations and demonstrations of techniques such as welding, casting, modeling and carving. Class lectures will incorporate historical and contemporary examples. Class projects will allow students to practice technique while developing a personal approach to material and process. Emphasis is placed on skill development, experimentation, creative thinking and quality craftsmanship.

FS210: Sculpture II

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Sculpture I

Sculpture 2 and 3 are intermediate courses for students who want to build on their understanding of three-dimensional art and materials. Emphasis is placed on skill refinement and developing a personal approach to material and process. Students will explore how materials, processes and ideas can be used to make a body of work. The class format will include image presentations and demonstrations of advanced techniques in kiln-fused glass, stained-glass, casting, carving and modeling. Emphasis will be placed on material exploration, self-expression and high-quality craftsmanship.

FS240: Sculpture III

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Sculpture II

Sculpture 2 and 3 are intermediate courses for students who want to build on their understanding of three-dimensional art and materials. Emphasis is placed on skill refinement and developing a personal approach to material and process. Students will explore how materials, processes and ideas can be used to make a body of work. The class format will include image presentations and demonstrations of advanced techniques in kiln-fused glass, stained-glass, casting, carving and modeling. Emphasis will be placed on material exploration, self-expression and high-quality craftsmanship.

FS350: Sculpture IV

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Sculpture III

Sculpture 4, 5 and 6 are advanced-level sculpture courses for highly motivated sculpture students that build upon advanced technical skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular sculpture medium. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works.

FS380: Sculpture V

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Sculpture IV

Sculpture 4, 5 and 6 are advanced-level sculpture courses for highly motivated sculpture students that build upon advanced technical skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular sculpture medium. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works.

FS450: Sculpture VI

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Sculpture V

Sculpture 4, 5 and 6 are advanced-level sculpture courses for highly motivated sculpture students that build upon advanced technical skills, emphasizing further and more extensive work with a particular sculpture medium. Students propose to develop a particular conceptual idea over a series of works.

FS480: Advanced Portfolio Sculpture

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: A total of six terms of 3-Dimensional offerings. Available only to Sixth Formers or Fifth Formers with departmental approval.

This course consists of an in-depth exploration of three-dimensional art with the aim of creating a rich personal portfolio, which also will satisfy the requirements of the Advanced Placement 3-Di-mensional Design Portfolio to be submitted to the College Board. Students are expected to design projects for their own area of concentration in media such as ceramics, wood, metal, stone or plaster and are expected to demonstrate their breadth of abilities in all aspects of their three-dimensional work, including volume, scale, shape, texture, color, negative and positive space and other sculptural elements. Students also will organize an exhibition of their work.

Music

MU100: Non-Credit Music

Full Year

[May be taken for more than one year.]

Private yearlong instruction is available to all students who want to study music for no credit/no grade. Daily practice is required. Music studied in this course is based on individual needs and abilities and may include a broad spectrum of styles and genres, based on personal interests. A fee is charged for these lessons. As the School retains contracted music teachers annually based on the full academic year registrations received, early withdrawal from these music lessons does not release families from their financial obligations for the academic year. Please know that students may choose the options of Non-Credit Music lessons for the full academic year, for the Winter and Spring Terms, or for the Spring Term only.

MU110: Foundations in Music

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

[May be taken as a three-term sequence.]

Designed for music students and for non-musicians with an interest in the subject, this course will explore the development of music from all time periods and traditions, leading to the present day. Listening, analyzing and discussing musical works from a diverse variety of traditions, the student will gain a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the power of musical expression and for the composers and performers who have brought music to life during the last six centuries. The course will include an exploration of a variety of national styles, time periods, musical patronage, schools of thought and prominent composers, leading to a contextualization of the musical arts with a clear historical perspective.

MU110: Applied Music I

Full Year: 3 credits

[Although the standard Arts fee applies, private and group lessons are free of charge to all students enrolled in Applied Music.]

This course is offered to musicians who are new to SPS and the ensemble program, and fulfills the one-year Arts graduation requirement through participation in one or more of the School’s ensembles (Choir, Orchestra, Small Ensembles). The yearlong Applied Music 1 curriculum consists of two basic musicianship classes (BMC), one private or group lesson on their chosen instrument, and two or more evening ensemble rehearsals each week for those who qualify. Based on a placement test in the beginning of the year, it is possible that students will be placed in Introduction to Applied Music in-stead of Applied Music 1. Ensemble rehearsals are typically held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings for 90: minutes each. Grades are based on performance in BMC, lessons and ensemble participation. Each term, a 5-10: minute skill evaluation (jury) is required. Musicians who do not pass the audition for an ensemble — or play an instrument for which there is no ensemble offered — will be assigned to evening practice sessions during ensemble meeting times. Students must pass the BMC portion of Applied Music 1 to receive credit for the course and move to Applied Music 2

MU210 Applied Music II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Applied Music I

[May be taken for more than one year.]

This course is a continuation of the Applied Music curriculum and is offered to students who have fulfilled the Basic Musicianship requirement by successfully completing the Basic Musicianship Class and Applied Music 1. Students enrolled in this class receive two private lessons, or one private and one group lesson, per week and must participate in one or more Major Ensembles. More advanced students are encouraged to participate in smaller “splinter” groups such as Madrigal Choir, Chamber Music, Jazz Ensemble or other small ensembles coordinated by members of the Music Program faculty. Each term, a 5-10: minute skill evaluation (jury) is required. Applied Music satisfies the School’s Arts graduation requirement

MU310: Applied Music III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Applied Music I

[May be taken for more than one year.]

This course is a continuation of the Applied Music curriculum and is offered to students in their third year in the program who have fulfilled the Basic Musicianship requirement by successfully completing the Basic Musicianship Class and Applied Music 1. Students enrolled in this class receive two private lessons, or one private and one group lesson, per week and must participate in one or more Major Ensembles. More advanced students are encouraged to participate in smaller “splinter” groups such as Madrigal Choir, Chamber Music, Jazz Ensemble or other small ensembles coordinated by members of the Music Program faculty. Each term, a 5-10: minute skill evaluation (jury) is required. Applied Music satisfies the School’s Arts graduation requirement

MU320: Music Theory

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Applied Music I with Basic Musicianship.

This is a course for students who have fulfilled the requirements of Basic Musicianship and wish to enhance their understanding of how music is structured and created. A detailed study of melody, rhythm and harmony, in conjunction with the analysis of works by master composers, emphasizes the integration of hearing and writing. These skills are developed through daily exercises in composition and ear training. This course is the equivalent of a first-year college course and prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in Music Theory.

MU420: Music Composition Private Study

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: A passing grade in Basic Musicianship and permission of the Director of Music.

[Full year recommended; option of one or two lessons per week.]

Using the basic knowledge of music theory, writing and performing original compositions is the aim of this credit course. Proficiency on an instrument — preferably keyboard — or in voice is recommended. No previous experience in composition is necessary, but a willingness to explore and experiment is essential to realizing the goals of this course

 

Theater

TH110: Foundations in Acting

Fall Term: 1 credit

The fall term of Foundations in Acting is an introductory course to all subsequent theater courses. During this term, students will engage their imagination, creativity and spontaneity through the use of exercises and improvisations. The course is designed for beginning-level students who want to explore and experience various acting techniques and the elements of theater. This course acts as their platform and knowledgebase to pursue further theater performance or technical theater pursuits.

TH110: Foundations in Acting Craft

Winter Term: 1 credit

This course is designed to be taken in sequential order with Fundamentals in Acting through Improvisation. However, students who did not take the Fall Term course are highly encouraged to join this course during Winter Term.

Acting Craft is designed for the beginning-level student who wants to explore acting skills. You will learn basic skills of acting and textual analytical skills by using improvisation and, toward the end of the term, scripted material. Students develop skills and freedom necessary to react spontaneously and honestly from moment to moment.

TH110: Foundations in Acting Craft II

Spring Term: 1 credit

This course is designed to be taken in sequential order with Acting Craft. However, students who did not take the winter term are highly encouraged to join this course during the spring term.

Acting Craft II is designed for the beginning- to intermediate-level student. This course will continue the study of basic acting skills and will focus on scripted material for study and interpretation. Students will explore further textual analytical skills while exploring vocal and physical skills needed for communication of the thoughts and ideas expressed in text that are essential for building an empathic well developed character.

TH210: Musical Theater Ensemble

Fall Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Previous vocal training or permission of the Director.

Musical Theater Ensemble is designed for any student who wants to explore and learn about musical theater. This course introduces students to various musical theater repertoire, concentrating on ensemble techniques. Students will be introduced to basic vocal skills, acting skills and various movement and dance styles. If you love musicals or just want to explore what musical theater is all about, this course is for you.

 

TH210: Musical Theater Acting The Song

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Previous vocal training or permission of the Director.

This course is designed to be taken in sequential order with Musical Theater Ensemble. However, students who did not take the Fall Term course are highly encouraged to join this course during the Winter Term.

Acting the Song is designed to train the actor/singer. A combination of acting, voice and movement techniques are used to help students explore and develop their total instrument. Students work in individual musical theater pieces focusing on textual analytical skills, musical skills, personal interpretation skills and audition techniques. By the end of the term, each student will have at least two songs suitable for any musical theater audition.

TH310: Musical Theater Scene Study

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Previous vocal training or permission of the Director.

This course is designed to be taken in sequential order with Musical Theater: Acting the Song. However, students who did not take the Winter Term course are highly encouraged to join this course during the Spring Term.

Scene study is designed for the beginning-inter-mediate to advanced student. Students explore and analyze a variety of different musical theater styles and focus primarily on the study of scripted musical theater material. Students further develop textual analytical skills, vocal skills, musicality and movement skills. These skills are essential for developing the techniques needed to mesh seamessly the acting scene into the song that follows. Students will explore techniques to work efficiently together and to continue to develop the freedom necessary to react spontaneously and honestly from moment to moment.

TH310: Scene Study Auition technique

Fall Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Two years previous acting training or permission of the Director

Audition technique is designed for the beginning-intermediate to advanced student. Through scripted material the students will be introduced to all techniques needed to excel in any theater performance audition. Practical techniques in the selections, preparation and performance of auditions pieces will be the focus. By the end of the term, each student will have at least two monologues suitable for any acting audition

TH310: Scene Study I

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Two years previous acting training or permission of the Director.

This course is designed to be taken in sequential order with Scene Study: Audition Technique. However, students who did not take the Fall Term course are highly encouraged to join this course during the Winter Term.

No prerequisite required.Scene Study I is designed for the beginning-intermediate to advanced student. The course focuses on developing fundamental skills used in rehearsing and performing modern realistic plays. Through exploration of various acting techniques, students acquire the tools and skills essential for honest character development. Students will be introduced to scripted material from various modern playwrights.

TH410: Scene Study II

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Two years previous acting training or permission of the Director.

This course is designed to be taken in sequential order with Scene Study I. However, students who did not take the Winter Term course are highly encouraged to join this course during the Spring Term.

Scene Study II is designed for the intermediate to advanced student. This course combines scene work, improvisation with creative exploration of the voice, and movement. The student focus will be on the most advanced textual analysis and character development skills. Students will work with scripted material from various American and international playwrights.

HUMANITIES

Core Courses

HU110: Humanities III

Full Year: 6 credits (2 credits per term)

Humanities III introduces students to what will be a four-year experience that expects collaboration, student-centered learning and richly interactive discussions. A key aspect of this program is its focus on a very wide range of “texts,” which might include a novel, a movie, a poem, a map, an African mask, a vase from Ancient Greece, a historical ruler, a painting, a propaganda poster and so on. We teach students to “read” such texts and to become adept at making significant connections between them. We seek to inspire in students an appreciation for the way in which terms such as man, woman, nature, God and city differ in societies, and are not simple words at all. We also use the idea of “self as text” to encourage students’ personal understanding of their own complex cultures and an appreciative curiosity about the cultures of each other. We focus on the individual, exploring the archetype of the “hero’s journey.” We look at the societies that human beings create, and ask what happens when we live together. We explore questions of power, leadership and the place of the individual in the society. We examine how different societies and cultures have interacted and come into conflict (or, less frequently, into cooperation) across history and we pay attention to the experience of individuals in times of change and turmoil — what happens when humans are caught within a society in conflict?

Throughout their studies, students continuously develop their critical and creative thinking skills through close reading, writing, discussion and presentations. Students work in a variety of other creative media throughout the year, including creating plays, movies,

HU210: Humanities IV

Full Year: 6 credits (2 credits per term)

In Humanities IV, students explore the complex relationship between individuals and their communities through a varied and integrated disciplinary approach. Building on the conception of the self considered in Humanities III and anticipating the examination of the forces and beliefs shaping our modern world studied in Humanities V, Humanities IV investigates why individuals choose to come together in community, how they cope with tension and change and how communities develop and evolve.

Considering specific periods in American history, students explore primary and secondary texts, such as historical documents, artwork and literature. Discussion and activity-driven classes encourage students to develop a curiosity about the United States, develop their own perspectives and value others’ viewpoints. Students practice writing as a critical means of self-expression with emphasis on analytical and creative writing. Varied assessments foster skill building that includes critical reading, research, visual image analysis and public speaking. A major research project examining some aspect of American history or culture is conducted in the Spring Term.

HU310: Humanities V

Full Year: 6 credits (2 credits per term)

In Humanities V, students engage in a rich inter-disciplinary study of the human experience in the modern world. Extending the studies of self and community explored in Humanities III and IV, Humanities V examines the forces and ideologies that have shaped the modern world, the conflicts that arise between differing ideologies and the challenges and responsibilities of living in the 21st century. Students explore connections across cultures, timelines, borders and canons in a quest to answer the question, “How, then, shall we live?” Through a close examination of diverse texts, students imaginatively and rigorously recreate the context both informing and informed by these works. Students refine the skill of close reading and develop critical vocabularies for various disciplines. Beyond the expository essay, students engage in a variety of other assessments to develop greater appreciation for and control of the nuances of language and self-expression. Focused on creating a culture of collaborative learning, the teacher models and facilitates the development of critical listening and effective speaking skills. The course culminates in a year-end capstone project of the student’s choice

Electives

HU310: Essay Writing

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course is designed to help young writers refine their prose by experimenting with nonfiction essay writing. Students will work over the course of the term reading various models of essay writing by professional writers and exploring their own voices to create clear, concise, engaging prose. For Sixth Formers, the course may generate good material for college essays, although this is not the goal of the course. Some of the various prose models students will examine and write themselves include sharing a narrative, illustrating an idea, explaining a process, comparing and contrasting, using definition, arguing persuasively. Throughout the term students will learn ways to generate ideas, keep an active journal, help one another in regular in-class writing workshops and discover the value of the revision process.

HU310: History of American Journalism

Fall or Spring Term: 1 credit

From the first instance of censorship in 1690 to yesterday’s news, journalism has been the back-bone of American politics and culture. This course explores the beginnings of journalism, the First Amendment and the role of freedom of the press in shaping American democracy. Additionally, the course examines the shifting forms of journalism in recent years and the role of technology and social media, including citizen journalism and fake news. Students will write both analyses of current news coverage and their own narrative journalism. Possible texts include Sacco’s “Journalism,” Daly’s “America: A Narrative History of a Nation’s Journalism,” Gladstone’s “The Influencing Machine” and more.

HU310: Boarding School Literature

Winter Term: 1 credit

Boarding schools are consistently chosen as the setting for novels, short stories and poems. Some-thing about this concentration of teenagers makes for an appealing backdrop to examine the human condition. In this course, students will read literature about boarding schools — such as “A Separate Peace,” by John Knowles, “The Fall of Rome,” by Martha Southgate, and “Black Ice,” by Lorene Cary ‘74 — and try to articulate just what it is about the adolescent experience at boarding school that makes this literature so enthralling. Additionally, students will use their own experiences in conjunction with the texts to both broadly explore the utility of boarding schools in a constantly evolving societal landscape and to more narrowly examine St. Paul’s School, its community and its culture

HU410: American Government

Fall or Winter Term: 1 credit

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the institutions, processes and actors that comprise the American political system at the national level and engage them in empirical and critical thinking regarding the nature and quality of American democracy. The course begins with an examination of the ways we can systematically examine American politics, and then turns to the structure of American government with an emphasis on the divisions of power between levels and branches of government. We’ll investigate the legislative and executive branches of government, looking specifically at the workings of the Congress, presidency and bureaucracy, and how these institutions engage in policy-making and policy execution. The role of American elections and the combination of forces that lead to policy change also will be examined. We will end the course by considering the American judicial system and its role in our system of government. Current events will be incorporated regularly and used as lenses into the issues we are studying

HU410 American Politics

Fall or Winter Term: 1 credit

In this course students will study current political issues and trends. We will analyze the partisan divide in the country and how this engenders political division in American government. We will discuss the dynamics, organization and decision-making processes of the American Congress and pay attention to the relationship between legislators and their constituents and legislators and the President. We also will examine the growth of presidential power, the cult of presidential personality and the issue of presidential accountability. Some crucial questions we might address include: What is the relationship between citizens and elected officials? How do the political parties function in terms of decisions made by members of Congress? How is power balanced among the three branches of government? At its heart, this course will be a current events course focusing on issues within the political system of the United States.

HU410: American Fiction

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course surveys the trends and writers of the last 40 years in American fiction, considering, among other things, the ways in which contemporary fiction has emerged out of the traditions studied in Humanities IV and Humanities V. The course focuses on multiple genres, aspects of form in contemporary prose fiction and recurring themes involving individual identity in the conformist culture of contemporary America. Students will leave the course with a sense of some of the many directions taken by contemporary American fiction as well as a desire to read more works by writers who have spurred their interest through their brief encounter with them. Authors may include Joseph Heller, Jack Kerouac, Toni Morrison, Julie Otsuka, Kurt Vonnegut and Alice Walker

HUMANITIES 21HU410: THE ARTISTRY OF JAMES JOYCE: “DUBLINERS” AND “A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN”

Fall Term: 1 credit

This course focuses on two works by James Joyce, one of the most acclaimed authors of the early 20th century. “Dubliners” is a collection of short stories that combine to give a vivid and challenging portrait of life in Dublin as Joyce perceived and experienced it. “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” is Joyce’s fictional presentation of the autobiography of a young writer and is a powerful and artistically important work that helped define the literary movement known as Modernism. Close study of these two works opens up a world of literary imagination and powerful prose that invites students to read deeply, think creatively and write expressively

HU410: Brahma to Buddha

Fall or Winter Term: 1 credit

[Satisfies diploma requirement in religious studies.]

This course introduces students to two of the world’s great religions: Hinduism and Buddhism. Students will engage in an in-depth study of the mythology, philosophy, imagery and devotional practices of the two belief systems. Art, music, dance, myth, yoga and meditation all will figure prominently in our course of study, as will field trips to Hindu and Buddhist temples.

HU410: Contempoary Ethics

Fall or Winter Term: 1 credit

This course is a discussion-based seminar focusing on questions concerning academic frameworks for contemporary ethics. The term begins with an overview of the modern framework for ethics (e.g., consequentialism, deontological ethics, virtue eth-ics) before examining the nuances of contemporary writers through the study of thought experiments. Students will discuss the practical application of ethical philosophies. Writing exercises will focus on demonstrating knowledge of ethical principles ac-cording to established philosophers and applying those principles to real-world scenarios

HU410: Creative Writing

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course is designed to help young writers experiment in order to find an original voice. Students work over the term toward a final portfolio of pieces in several media, which they can revise right up to the end. Offering the opportunity to try out poetry, fiction, personal writing, creative nonfiction and script writing, the course enables students to find their own writing voice. In addition, for Sixth Formers, the course yields interesting material that might be useful for the process of developing college es-says, but it will not specifically prepare students for that task. Students are taught how to read texts not in terms of literary analysis but in terms of their usefulness, regularly work-shopping their drafts with the rest of the group and studying new techniques and processes through a variety of assignments. The class also has the chance to work with visiting writers who come to St. Paul’s School as Schlesinger writers-in-residence or Conroy visitors.

HU410: Economic Theory and Practice

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

The three-fold design of this non-mathematical introduction to economics provides students with an overview of the discipline that can serve as a background for courses in related subjects, a foundation for further study in economics, and a knowledge base for becoming an informed worker, consumer and citizen. While examining briefly the history of economics and some of its seminal thinkers, the course concentrates on understanding basic economic theory (macro and micro), developing a practical knowledge of the workings of principal economic institutions (e.g., the Federal Reserve system, the stock market, the banking sector, etc.), and appreciating the subtle-ties of national economic policy, especially in light of current economic challenges.

 

HU410: Foundations in Philosophy

Fall Term: 1 credit

More than two millennia ago, the Greek philosopher Socrates argued that the unexamined life is not worth living. To better examine our lives, he urged us to do philosophy. This course is an introduction to the four major areas of philosophy — logic, epistemology, metaphysics and ethics. We will address questions such as: What is philosophy and how is it done? What is knowledge? Is reality subjective or objective? How does logic help us find truth? Is there such a thing as human nature, and is it good or bad? How should we interact with the natural world? We will read ancient and modern texts (and watch a few contemporary films) to discuss topics such as the nature of identity, the purpose of education and the scope and limit of human reason. The course will create a foundation for students wishing to take other courses in philosophy at SPS or at college

HU410: Introduction to Anthropology

Fall Term: 1 credit

This course will introduce students to the field of anthropology, a social science committed to the holistic study of humanity. Students will be introduced to the four main subfields — biological, linguistic, archaeological, sociocultural — as well as the history of how these fields of study emerged in the mid- to late- nineteenth century. The course will focus on the way that this field has challenged conventional notions of race, human origins and culture and been on the forefront of understanding differences among human societies. Students will be introduced to key anthropological concepts including cultural relativism, holism, ethnocentrism and race and culture. Students will write two critical essays and produce one creative assessment in a medium of their own choosing to demonstrate their understanding of a key anthropological concept. Course texts will be “Through the Lens of Anthropology” and selections from “Anthropology: Why It Matters” and “How to Think Like an Anthropologist.”

HU410: Religion & Ethics

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

[Satisfies diploma requirement in religious studies]

This course is a survey of religion as an important source of ethical analysis and moral decision-making. Students will engage the writing of ethicists of various religious traditions from Augustine, Aquinas, Bonhoeffer, Tillich and Niebuhr to Thich Nhat Hanh, Heschel and Townes. Students will be able to apply the ethical systems and writings to contemporary contexts and issues

HU410: Religion, Race and Gender

Fall or Winter Term: 1 credit

This course examines the interrelationships among religion, race and gender in American history and culture. Its content connects to components of the SPS Integrated Curriculum, from the LINC courses and from the Fifth and Sixth Form Seminar. The course contributes to two specific forms of students’ religious literacy: the way that religions shape and are shaped by their social/historical contexts; and the ways in which religions are internally diverse. Students will think and write critically about the ways that sacred texts, the body and material culture together shape our changing understandings of gender and race; examine the ways that understandings of gender and race influence who has authority within particular religious contexts; engage in literary analysis of sacred texts; and conduct a research project on a topic their own choosing.

HU410: SACRED LITERATURE & ETHICS: JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course is a survey of the sacred texts and histories of the Abrahamic religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We’ll look at the historical contexts out of which these traditions grew, and the influences that contributed to the formation of their most important writings. This course will look at the primary texts contained within the Hebrew Bible, Christian New Testament and Qur’an, as well as influential secondary texts written by faith practitioners across millennia. Questions about how prophetic and sacred texts have informed the ethics, practices and concepts of justice across time are central to this course. We’ll conclude by looking at the impact and legacies of these three religious traditions in the 21st century.

HU410: The Vietnam War

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course will provide students with the opportunity to examine in great detail one of the most important world events of the last 60 years: the conflict in Vietnam. Specific topics such as the life of the “grunt” and turmoil on the home front will be explored, as will larger questions about the nature of war itself in the second half of the 20th century. In an effort to answer questions about the war as it really was, versus that seen in popular literature and film, the class will consider a broad selection of media, as well as a variety of historical texts and essays. Documentaries and motion pictures to be studied include: “Hearts and Minds,” “The Hanoi Hilton,” “The Green Berets,” “Apocalypse Now,” “Platoon,” “Full Metal Jacket,” “Born on the 4th of July,” “Casualties of War” and others. Works read will include, but are not limited to, excerpts from: Philip Caputo’s “A Rumor of War,” Truong Nhu Tang’s “A Vietcong Memoir,” Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried,” Robert Mason’s “Chickenhawk,” Michael Herr’s “Dispatches,” Stanley Karnow’s “Vietnam: A History,” and a selection of essays from the anthology “Major Problems in the History of the Vietnam War.”

 

HU410: World War II

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course provides a historical overview of the Second World War so that students may effectively analyze literary works about specific aspects of the conflict. Beginning with an understanding of the Germans’ hatred of the Treaty of Versailles following their defeat in World War I, students will then take a look at the rise of Hitler in the 1930s as well as the growing isolationism in the United States prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. While this course does not review each WWII battle, significant military events (e.g., D-Day) will be studied alongside corollary elements of the war (e.g., Japanese internment; the Holocaust). Using film, oral histories and other primary sources, plus historical analysis written by leading historians, this course aims to spark students’ long-term interest in what Jackson J. Spielvogel asserts “was clearly Hitler’s war.

HU410: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Winter Term: 1 credit

This course investigates the rights and liberties provided by the U.S. Constitution, both past and present. Through discussion, readings and media, students will explore historical and contemporary topics related to American rights and liberties. These topics may include free speech, the right to vote, equal protections of the laws, and legal and social issues around race, gender, sexuality and ability. Activities may include reading and writing civil rights poetry, debates, analysis of Supreme Court decisions, mock trials and presentations.

HU410: Dystopian Literature

Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Could a utopian society ever exist, and why does a search for the perfect world typically backfire? How do authors use dystopian literature as a form of social commentary on their own societies, and how effective is this form of criticism? How are decades-old social commentaries relevant to our society today? In this course, we will strive to answer these questions as we study the works of Orwell and Atwood, among others. In addition, we will look at the way this genre has evolved with the emergence of several contemporary YA dystopian literature series. Besides novels, short stories and films/TV series may also be used.

HU410: Political Philosophy

Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Political philosophy is the study of people in societies, focusing on the claims they have on each other in the form of rights and obligations and their demands for justice, equality and liberty. It is concerned with an analysis of the state and related institutions. This course studies questions about sovereignty (the power and authority assumed by the ruler) and political obligation (the duty and submission assumed by the ruled). Students will examine questions such as: Under which conditions can political obligation arise and what is its extent? Are freedom and equality compatible? What is justice — an idea, an ideal or simply a routine legal process? What connection is there between justice and law? What is a law? How are laws justified and are there aspects of human life that laws should not attempt to regulate? Should we always obey the law or are there conditions under which breaking the law is justifiable?

HU410: Religion and Revolution

Winter Term: 1 credit

In this course, we will study the relationship be-tween contemporary religion and revolutionary politics. We often associate religious traditions with conservative tendencies that resist movements for radical change. In this class we will trouble this assumption by looking at modern examples of religious traditions that have articulated revolutionary and radical challenges to the status quo and explore the relationship between supernatural and transcendent commitments and revolutionary or radical movements. We will read Gustavo Gutiérrez’s “A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics and Salvation” in conversation with Hamid Dabashi’s “Islamic Liberation Theology: Resisting the Empire,” alongside a range of chapters, articles, blog posts and videos addressing the radical social movements of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will produce three critical engagements — one in a visual medium of the student’s choosing, one in the form of a written essay and one in the form of a presentation.

HU410: Science, Philosophy and Religion

Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Science and religion are arguably the two most influential human forces in the world today. In fact, most people ground their claims about truth and reality, and derive their reasons for action, in one or the other or some combination of both. Interestingly, many people take it for granted that science and religion are locked in a state of conflict, and that sooner or later one will finish the other off. This course will investigate the historical, logical and philosophical relationship between science and religion. Questions to be addressed include: What makes science scientific, and what makes religion religious? Are science and religion really in conflict, and if so, why? Are they mutually supporting? Can one be both an adherent to modern science and a person of an ancient faith? To what extent is belief in God rational and justifiable, and to what extent does it need to be? What should we think when various religious traditions conflict? What should we think in the face of religious paradoxes such the Problem of Evil and the Problem of Free Will? We also will give particular attention to some infamous interactions between science and religion (e.g., the Galileo affair, Darwin’s publishing of “Origin of Species,” the Scopes Monkey trial), trying to discern in each instance what the conflict was fundamentally about. Texts might include: “A Very Short Introduction to Science and Religion” (Dixon); “Dialogue on Good, Evil, and the Existence of God” (Perry); “Contact” (Sagan); and selections from Aquinas, Maimonides, Ibn Rushd, Stephen J. Gould, Richard Dawkins, Alister McGrath, Richard Swinburne, William James and many others.

Hu410: American Film and Culture, 1950s and 1960s

Spring Term: 1 credit

This course focuses on the historical and cultural forces of two consecutive decades in the United States: the 1950s and 1960s. With a thematic approach, the class explores issues of the American family, gender roles, race and other defining cultural values that have shaped modern America. To supplement the historical readings, classic American films are used as cultural centerpieces to enrich discussions and essays. Some of the films used in past classes include “Rebel Without a Cause,” “High Noon,” “Cool Hand Luke,” “The Graduate,” and “Dr. Strangelove.

HU410: American Foreign Policy

Spring Term: 1 credit

This course asks students to examine the paradigm that governs American foreign policy and the key moments in history when that paradigm has shifted. In our study of foreign policy decisions, this course examines America’s role as an imperial power, the role of human rights in America’s foreign policy decisions, the relationship between the United States and the United Nations, and the concept of America as the world’s global police. Students are expected to pay particular attention to current events. There are several research projects as a major component of this course.

HU410: America's Pastime Through Literature

Spring Term: 1 credit

This course will look closely at how the game of baseball has mirrored American social, political and economic currents. The course will follow a chronological timeline, from the rise of the major leagues in the 1870s through the modern era, paying particular attention to the game’s impact on individuals and families; racial discrimination and integration; labor relations; urbanization; roles of women; treatment of gay athletes; and implications of performance-enhancing drug.

HU410: Asian American Literature

Spring Term: 1 credit

This course examines historical and cultural con-texts of Asian American experiences through literature. How do Asian American writers generate texts and media within international culture? How does American literature represent intersectional identities? How do American writers and thinkers from various Asian cultures situate their cultural histories within the American narrative? How are Asian American voices part of contemporary American culture? Students in the course will study literature from diverse authors and examine both the influences of that literature and how it influences contemporary society.

HU410: Feminist Literature and Media

Spring Term: 1 credit

What and who is a feminist? Who benefits from the historical and contemporary feminist revolution? What is my own feminist philosophy? This course will look at the rise of feminist movements through-out history and across continents and the evolution of the movement to the contemporary landscape, analyze accompanying feminist literature both historical and contemporary, and culminate in an action-based project at the end of the term. By the end of the term, students will have crafted their own philosophy of feminism that will inspire their action- based term projects. In addition to reading the seminal works “The Second Sx,” by Simone de Beauvoir, and “Feminism Is for Every-body,” by bell hooks, students also will also venture into contemporary feminist theory and literature. Students will examine the works of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie with “Dear Ijeawele, Or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions” and “We Should All Be Feminists,” Roxane Gay’s essay collection “Bad Feminist,” and other relevant works.

HU410: Writing Culture

Spring Term: 1 term

In this course students will explore the many meanings and uses of the concept of “culture” and the genre of writing — ethnography — that has been a key form of its representation in academic re-search. After a brief, interdisciplinary survey of the history of the term from the 19th century through the 20th century in fields such as anthropology, sociology, political science, literature and theology, we will turn our attention to its place in our con-temporary world. The questions of the course are centered on the question of what we mean when we talk about culture: Who has it? What does it consist of? How is it related to other concepts of shared social life — such as society, ethnicity, race and religion? What does talk of culture illuminate? What does it obscure? How has the concept been used to explain human behavior and how can it be used in our explorations of shared life? Key readings in this course will come from Clifford Geertz, Kathryn Tanner, Stuart Hall, Edward Said, Talal Asad and Lila AbuLughod, among others. Students will write one critical essay and produce two short original pieces of ethnographic writing that explore these questions through their own cultural world at St. Paul’s and beyond.

LANGUAGES

Chinese Courses

CN110: Chinese I

Full Year: 3 credits

This is an immersion course for beginners. Students learn to express themselves and understand others by focusing on topics closely related to their daily life. The four tones and the pronunciation are introduced through the rhythmic verses in order to help students to develop a natural ear and tongue for the language. The pedagogy known as TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling) serves as a backbone for both oral comprehension and reading skills. Students also write the characters daily as they build up the foundation by practicing strokes, stroke orders and radicals.

CN210: Chinese II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese I

This course is a continuation of Chinese 1. Using increasingly complex vocabulary and sentence structures, students respond to a variety of functions: formulating questions, describing and narrating. Students read and write short compositions on a weekly basis. Cultural aspects of the language are emphasized through projects. Students are expected to practice a combination of typing and writing characters regularly as a supplement to intensive handwritten character writing.

CN260: Chinese II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese I

The course is designed for students who have a solid mastery of the grammar and vocabulary covered in Chinese 1. Students will continue to build essential vocabulary in order to read and write level-appropriate passages, develop speaking skills and become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society. In addition, the study of syntax is quite intense in this class and students are expected to express themselves with grammatical precision. Homework, essays and chapter tests are completed in pencil.

CN310: Chinese III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese II

This course builds on Chinese 2. Students have regular opportunities for meaningful communication by using more complex structures, vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. The focus of the course is to combine and expand elements previously learned to enable students to express themselves more accurately through a story-based approach. Students are expected to discuss readings and re-write stories in written assessments. Cultural aspects of the language are also emphasized. Multimedia aids are used. Students are expected to type their essays regularly, in supplement to intensive handwritten character writing.

CN360: Chinese III Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese II

This course is designed for students who have a thorough mastery of the grammatical structures and vocabulary covered in the second year. Students learn to state their own opinions in longer speeches using more complex structures and vocabulary. Reading skills continue to be developed using a variety of stories. Students should expect to complete oral and written assessments regularly according to the content of the stories.

CN410: Chinese IV

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese III

This course pays special attention to developing students’ oral and listening competence. Students read more extensively on various topics in the form of short stories and other literary pieces. Idiomatic expressions are introduced through reading literary selections. Students are expected to write regularly. Cultural aspects of the language are emphasized through focused term research projects. Multimedia aids are used on a regular basis. Students are expected to type their essays, in supplement to intensive handwritten character writing.

 

CN460: Chinese IV Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese III Honors

This immersion course pays special attention to developing students’ oral competence and listening skills through vocabulary, communication, listening exercises, readings and discussions around various themes. Students read more extensively on various topics in a variety of media including newspaper articles, short stories, and other literary pieces. Idiomatic expressions are introduced through literary selections. Students are encouraged to discuss current events and to develop their creativity through projects using posters, videos and oral presentations. Multimedia aids are used.

CN560: Chinese V Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese IV Honors

This course, designed for more advanced students, further develops overall Chinese language proficiency and knowledge of Chinese culture through movies, discussion, and extensive reading of various texts, including materials from newspapers, magazines and other authentic documents. Stu-dents master advanced-level language structures, expressive styles, and conventions of communication through topics reflecting multiple aspects of Chinese society and culture and the use of various authentic multimedia materials in different linguistic registers.

CN580: Chinese Seminar

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Chinese V Honors

This course is designed for advanced students who have completed Chinese 5 Honors. The focus is on reading, class discussion and writing. The materials for this course are chosen mostly from modern literary writings, but classical literary pieces are introduced as well.

French Courses

FR110: French I

Full Year: 3 credits

This course offers students an introduction to the language and culture of contemporary French-speaking countries. Grammar, vocabulary and syntax are studied using a film-based textbook with simple dialogues and oral and written drills to build conversational skills. Work in the Language Center reinforces the development of listening and speaking. The class is conducted mostly in French.

FR160: French I Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Head.

This course is designed for students with a strong basic background in French. Emphasis is placed on refining students’ listening, speaking and writing skills. Proficiency is honed through work in the Language Center and the use of a variety of multimedia materials that accompany the text. Gram-mar is reviewed thoroughly. The class is conducted in French from the beginning.

FR210: French II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French I

This course is the continuation of French 1. The basic study of grammar is completed, and reading selections and writing exercises of increasing complexity help students work on their language and conversational skills. The cultural component of this course gives students an understanding of the diversity of France and the Francophone world today.

FR260: French II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French I Honors

This course continues and consolidates the study of grammar established in French 1 Honors. Readings of increasing difficulty are introduced as the basis for expanded oral and written work through task-oriented and creative writing techniques. Texts studied represent a broad spectrum of cultures and ideas across Francophone societies.

FR310: French III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French II or French II Honors

In this course, emphasis is placed on refining students’ listening, speaking and writing skills along with a more complex study of grammatical structures. A variety of multimedia materials ac-companies a textbook rich in readings and articles that widen the students’ knowledge about societal trends in the Francophone world. Short readings and one-act plays enrich the understanding of French, and they also provide the basis of discussion, performances and writing exercises in French.

French III Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French 2 Honors or permission of the Department Head.

Using texts and materials that address contemporary societal trends, this course focuses on learning more about and connecting with the Francophone world and its literature. Oral proficiency is emphasized, grammar is thoroughly reviewed, reading skills are honed and analytical essay writing techniques are introduced

French IV

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French III

Cultural and historical Francophone themes are explored through literature, film and music. Critical reading skills continue to be developed using a variety of texts that include novels, short stories, plays and poetry. This course emphasizes analytical discussions, writing assignments and projects. Grammar continues to be reviewed with particular attention to its finer points.

FR460: French IV Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French II Honors

Francophone cinema, literature and contemporary events serve as springboards for discussion as we delve into issues facing the 21st century French-speaking world. This course explores a wide array of traditions and styles of discourse. Oral and aural proficiency are refined in conjunction with rigorous grammar review. Writing and reading skills are broadened across all genres.

FR510: French V

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French IV

This course is taught in the same manner as French 4. Students continue to strengthen their reading, writing, listening/understanding and speaking skills. Francophone culture and history provide the context for in-depth discussions and writing assignments on literary works, films and news media.

FR580: French Seminar I

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: French IV Honors

This course offers a survey of French literature. During the Fall and Winter Terms, students read French literary classics, beginning in the Middle Ages and focusing on one work per century. In spring they study novels from the contemporary Francophone world. The students also view French language films at home and draw connections with the readings. Class discussions focus primarily on close readings and assess the works within their historical and literary contexts. The writings and films additionally serve as springboards for thinking through social constructs and theoretical concepts such as race, gender, sexuality and intersectionality. The students improve their writing skills through frequent short writing assignments and in-class essays. Leading discussions and delivering presentations allows them to fine-tune their speaking abilities

German Courses

GE110: German I

Full Year: 3 credits

This course offers students an introduction to the language and culture of contemporary German-speaking countries. Grammar, vocabulary and syntax are studied through oral and written drills and through simple conversations. Work in the Language Center reinforces the development of listening and speaking skills. The class is conducted in German from the beginning.

GE210: German II

Full year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German I

his course is a continuation of German 1 and is taught in the same manner. The basic study of grammar is completed, and readings of increasing difficulty are introduced as the basis for expanded oral and written work. By the end of the course, students are able to use workable, basic German in normal situations they encounter and are able to enjoy works written in simple German.

GE260: German II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German I and permission of the Department Head.

This course is a continuation of German 1 and is taught in the same manner. The basic study of grammar is completed and readings of increasing difficulty are introduced as the basis for expanded oral and written work. The course includes an introduction to German history, literature, film and cultural topics through the German language. By the end of the course, students are able to use workable basic German in normal situations they encounter and are able to enjoy works written in simple German.

GE310: German III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German II

This is a multifaceted course, designed to introduce students to German culture through literature, history, contemporary politics, music and popular culture. Materials used include shorter literary works such as short stories, novellas, plays and poetry, as well as film and a variety of news media. Proficiency and grammatical accuracy continue to be emphasized through written and oral exercises.

GE360: Geramn III Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German 2 Honors and permission of the Department Head.

This is a multifaceted course, designed to introduce students to German culture through literature, history, contemporary politics, music and popular culture. Materials used include shorter literary works such as short stories, novellas, plays and poetry, as well as film and a variety of news media. Proficiency and grammatical accuracy continue to be emphasized through written and oral exercises.

GE410: German IV

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German III

Issues and themes of cultural and historical relevance are explored through literature, film and current events. Critical reading skills continue to be developed using a variety of texts, which include plays, lyric poetry, fiction and news articles. The course emphasizes discussion, analytical papers and projects. Grammar continues to be reviewed with particular attention to its finer points and the use of idioms

GE460: German IV Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German III Honors

Issues and themes of cultural and historical relevance are explored through literature, film and current events. Critical reading skills continue to be developed using a variety of texts, which include plays, lyric poetry, fiction and news articles. The course emphasizes discussion, analytical papers and projects. Grammar continues to be reviewed with particular attention to its finer points and the use of idioms

GE560: German V Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German IV Honors

This course is a continuation of German 4 Honors and is taught in the same manner. Students continue to strengthen their four language skills of reading, writing, listening/understanding and speaking. German culture and history provide the context for in-depth discussions and writing assignments on literary works, film and news media.

GE580: German Seminar

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: German V Honors

This course is designed for advanced students who have completed German 5 Honors. Current events focusing on German-speaking countries, lyric poetry, longer literary works and German film provide the basis for discussions and writing assignments. Reading, writing, listening/understanding and speaking skills continue to be refined based on the needs of the students.

Greek/Latin Courses

GR110: Greek I

Full Year: 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to Attic Greek forms, vocabulary and grammar, employing readings of graduated difficulty. Students also learn Greek mythology, the historical origins of Greek civilization, the geography of Greece and the eastern Mediterranean, and aspects of daily life in ancient Greece.

GR210: Greek II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Greek I

This course begins with a review of Greek grammar, then introduces the more complex verb forms and dependent clauses using the subjunctive and optative moods. Students learn the history of the classical period, including the Athenian Empire and the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars. Toward the end of the course, students encounter readings from prose authors such as Herodotus, Xenophon, Lysias and Lucian.

GR360: Greek III Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Greek II

In the Fall Term this course concludes the introduction to Greek prose with extended readings from texts such as Plato’s dialogues and Thucydides’ “History of the Peloponnesian War.” In the Winter and Spring Terms students are introduced to Greek poetry through selections from Homer’s “Iliad” and “Odyssey,” the lyric poets, or Athenian tragedy and comedy.

GR460: Greek IV Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Greek III Honors

This advanced-reading course provides a survey of the rise and fall of Athenian democracy through extended readings from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the philosophers Plato and Aristotle, and Greek tragedy and comedy.

LT130: Latin Bridge

Full Year: 3 credits

This course is for students who have some back-ground in Latin. Students obtain a solid foundation in vocabulary, forms, grammatical constructions and reading comprehension. Students also gain an overview of classical mythology, Roman history, daily life and the geography of the ancient world.

LT110: Latin I

Full Year: 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the Latin language and syntax. Graduated readings in Latin explore events in the life of a typical Roman household while also teaching vocabulary, forms and grammatical constructions. Students also gain an overview of classical mythology, Roman history, daily life and the geography of the ancient world.

LT210: Latin II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Latin I

This course begins with a review of material from Latin 1. Students learn more advanced grammatical concepts such as purpose and result clauses, conditional sentences and other uses of the subjunctive and gerunds and gerundives. Students continue to develop reading proficiency via textual narrative. Students also examine pertinent cultural and historical topics.

LT260: Latin II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Latin I

This course offers an accelerated approach to the language. Emphasis is placed on advanced syntax, including uses of the subjunctive, uses of the cases of nouns and techniques for translation and reading comprehension. Students study and pursue projects on a wide variety of cultural, historical and linguistic topics. Toward the end of the course, students encounter readings from prose authors such as Caesar, Livy and Nepos.

LT310: Latin III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Latin II

This course begins with a brief review of grammar and syntax learned in the previous two years. Students continue to reinforce grammatical concepts and improve their Latin-to-English translation as they read graduated selections from adapted texts by prose authors such as Eutropius, Livy, Nepos and Caesar. Emphasis is placed on improving sight translation and reading comprehension. Readings also introduce students to major figures, events and cultural topics from the legends of early Rome and the history of the Roman Republic.

LT360: Latin III Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Latin II Honors

This course offers a rapid review of the fundamentals of grammar combined with accelerated readings from a selection of Latin prose authors such as Caesar, Livy and Cicero. Through these readings students trace Rome’s development from city-state to world empire and the concomitant evolution of the constitution from the Monarchy through the Republic to the Principate.

LT410: Latin IV

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Latin III

This is a reading-based course focused on selections from the poetry of Catullus, Virgil and Ovid. Formal review of advanced grammatical concepts will be provided as necessary. The course provides students with an opportunity to analyze Roman texts as they improve their reading comprehension and sight translation skills. Various cultural and historical projects may include studies of Roman poetry, mythology and love in the Roman world, and the reception of the works read in later artists and authors.

LT470: Latin IV Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Latin III Honors

This is a reading-based course focused on the historical development and aesthetic principles of Roman poetry. Selections from Catullus, Virgil, Horace and Ovid provide the basis for class discussions. In addition to poetic scansion and literary devices, students will explore the social, cultural and political context of these authors.

LT510: Latin V

Full Year: 3 credit

Prerequisite: Latin IV

This course introduces students to the comic literature of ancient Rome through advanced readings chosen from comedy, satire, invective and the novel and culminates in the production of a play in Latin. Authors read may include Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Horace, Petronius, Seneca and Apuleius. Students also consult models from Greek literature in English translation and modern plays and films inspired by Roman originals.

LT560: Latin V Honors

Full Year: 3 Credits

Prerequisite: Latin IV Honors

This course introduces students to the comic literature of ancient Rome through advanced readings chosen from comedy, satire, invective and the novel and culminates in the production of a play in Latin. Authors read may include Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Horace, Petronius, Seneca and Apuleius. Students also consult models from Greek literature in English translation and modern plays and films inspired by Roman originals.

Spanish Courses

SP110: Spanish I

Full Year: 3 credits

This course offers an introduction to the language and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Grammar, syntax and vocabulary are studied through oral and written drills and through simple conversations. Work in the Language Center reinforces the development of listening and speaking skills. The class is conducted mostly in Spanish.

SP160: Spanish I Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Head.

This course offers a thorough, rapid review of basic Spanish grammar followed by a continuation of intensive grammar and vocabulary studies. Exercises and drills, conducted both in class and in the Language Center, are an integral part of the course. A series of short videos reinforces listening skills and provides a context for dialogues in order to strengthen speaking skills. The course introduces students to the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking countries through a study of short literary selections and articles.

SP210: Spanish II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish I

This course is a continuation of Spanish 1. A study of basic vocabulary and grammar is completed by the end of the year, and there is greater emphasis on cultural readings and perspectives. Students further develop communication skills and are able to use basic Spanish in varied situations.

 

SP260: Spanish II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish I Honors or permission of the Department Head.

This intensive course offers a challenging and thorough review of all fundamental Spanish grammar. Advanced vocabulary is introduced, increasing students’ capacity for both oral and written proficiency. The course includes adapted selections of Hispanic literature, frequent compositions and required oral participation

SP310: Spanish III

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish II

This course is designed to strengthen speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. During the year, students solidify previously studied grammar and vocabulary and further develop communication skills. Students read and discuss short stories and poems that reflect cultural elements of Spanish-speaking countries.

SP360: Spanish III Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish II Honors or Permission of the Department Head.

Students in this course are expected to develop a high level of proficiency in Spanish as we emphasize reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students read short stories, poems, essays and articles of major Hispanic authors. Students participate in daily discussions of the literature that include the cultural, social and political contexts of these works. Compositions are assigned regularly. The course also includes an intensive and fast-paced review of Spanish grammar. Proficiency and grammatical accuracy continue to be emphasized through written and oral exercises.

SP410: Spanish IV

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish III

In this sequence of classes, students explore themes of cultural and historical importance through literature, film, and current events. Students are exposed to a diversity of voices and continue to develop reading skills by reading a variety of texts, including poetry, fiction and news articles. In addition, students review and strengthen their reading, writing, listening and conversational skills. Students are expected to participate actively in discussions of literature and culture.

SP460: Spanish IV Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish III Honors

In this class students expand their active knowledge of Spanish through the study of literature, film and other media. In the fall we discuss a series of plays; the winter is devoted to short stories; and in the spring, we read poetry and essays. Each term also includes a film. Assessments include expository and creative writing in Spanish, frequent quizzes on class materials and the performance of spoken exercises. No English is used in the classroom. While occasional grammar review is provided, students are expected to improve their Spanish by constant exposure to and use of the language. The class also includes occasional discussion of strategies for language learning

SP510: Spanish V

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Full Year of Spanish IV

In this course students continue to explore Latin American culture and history through current events, texts and film. Students are expected to participate actively in discussions in order to continue to strengthen their communication skills. In addition, students further hone their writing skills through weekly compositions

SP580: Spanish Seminar I

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish IV Honors

In this course students use literature, film and other media to strengthen their active use of idiomatic language, a broad vocabulary and complex sentences. The bulk of class time is dedicated to the close analysis of literary works, although we also discuss historical events, films, visual arts, music and contemporary politics and society. Topics and materials date from medieval Iberia and colonial Latin America to the contemporary Spanish-speaking world.

SP590: Spanish Seminar II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Spanish Seminar I

Seminar 1 and 2 constitute a two-year cycle. Because very few students take both seminars, the structure of the class is the same. Thus, the description of Seminar 1 applies equally to Seminar 2. However, because some students do take both seminars, the selection of readings and other materials is different.

MATHEMATICS

MA100: ALGEBRA I

Full Year: 3 credits

This course provides students with a solid foundation in their study of mathematics. The course begins with the study of signed numbers, fractions and operations with literal expressions. We study linear equations, systems of equations and inequalities. We also consider polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, fractional equations, quadratic equations and radical expressions. Throughout, applications to problem solving are discussed as a transition into geometry and second-year algebra.

MA110: Geometry

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course in Euclidean geometry develops a logical and rigorous mathematical system based on definitions, postulates and theorems. Deductive proof is the backbone of the course, which includes properties of parallel lines, triangle congruence and similarity, polygons, circles, area and volume. Additional topics include right-triangle trigonometry and coordinate geometry. Computer applications are utilized to enhance understanding of geometric concepts. Concepts from Algebra 1 are reinforced throughout the course.

MA210: Algebra II

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

Students extend their knowledge of methods, skills and concepts introduced in Algebra 1. The focus is on functions: linear, quadratic, logarithmic, polynomial, exponential and rational. Additional topics include the complex number system and solving systems of linear equations. Analytic techniques are emphasized. Students are instructed in the use of a graphing calculator, a tool they use to explore and investigate as well as to model and analyze data.

MA250: Algebra II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry and permission of the Department Head.

This is a rigorous course intended for students of demonstrated ability who have the desire and capability to learn and work independently and to think creatively. The entire content of Algebra 2 is studied in greater depth. Additionally, the course includes the study of matrices, graphing techniques, linear programming and systems of nonlinear equations. The TI-84 graphing calculator is used for exploration, confirmation and analysis.

MA300: Foundations in Precalculus

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Geometry and two years of algebra.

This course leverages concepts learned in Algebra 2 and extends students’ prior knowledge of algebraic and geometric methods, skills and concepts in preparation for the study of calculus. Care is given to identify and remedy areas of past difficulty for students. Topics include trigonometry, sequences and series, counting and probability, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing technology is used throughout the course to enhance student understanding of mathematical concepts. Real-world applications illustrate and reinforce mathematical ideas.

MA310: Precalculus

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Geometry and two years of algebra.

Students strengthen their understanding of previously learned topics in algebra and geometry and learn new conceptual notions needed for the study of calculus. Topics include trigonometry, conic sections, sequences and series, counting and probability, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing technology is used throughout the course to enhance student understanding of mathematical concepts. Real-world applications illustrate and reinforce mathematical ideas.

MA310: Chaos Theory

Fall Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II

In this course we will explore the intriguing history, ideas and applications of chaos theory. We will read from James Gleick’s “Chaos” and Ian Stewart’s “Does God Play Dice? The New Mathematics of Chaos” and learn about mathematicians John Conway, Edward Lorenz, Robert May, Benoit Mandelbrot and others. To help us to connect with the idea of “sensitive dependence on initial condition,” we will explore cellular automata, read a Dr. Seuss story, watch (Lorenzian) water wheels and observe iterative behavior in nonlinear systems. We will study the logistic map in order to visualize an orderly system turning chaotic and then look at strange attractors in order to find order in chaos. We will explore and analyze the hidden wonders of the Mandelbrot Set; this fractal icon will serve as an artistic masterpiece exemplifying chaotic behavior. Students will leave the course understanding the limitations of using mathematical laws to predict orderly behavior.

MA310: Nodes and Edges: Applications of Graph Theory

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry

Have you ever wondered how to solve the problems in “Good Will Hunting”? In this class, students will use graph theory to identify optimal solutions to network and design problems. How many bishops can be placed on a chessboard such that no two of them are attacking each other? How does an airline plan its routes? What is the winning strategy for the game Tic-Tac-Toe? This course will look for the answers to these questions and more by exploring the growing field of graph theory

MA310: Mathematical Problem-solving

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra II

To expand and explore new problem-solving skills, every class will be filled with a variety of group and solo activities to engage students. Much of the focus of the course will be on Japanese-style logic puzzles such as KenKen and Nurikabe. Students will learn to solve such puzzles as well as create their own. By the end of the course, students will have learned over 20: different types of logic puzzles, each of which will help them develop different aspects of their critical thinking skills. The course will culminate with a presentation, as each student will research a different type of logic puzzle that they will master and teach to the class.

MA350: Precalculus Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra II Honors and permission of the Department Head.

This is a rigorous course intended for students of demonstrated ability who have the desire and capability to learn and work independently and to think creatively. Students pursue a comprehensive study of the content of precalculus in greater depth. Additionally, the course includes topics in advanced algebra, mathematical induction, vectors, polar and parametric equations, limits of functions and rates of change. This material provides a strong preparation for calculus. Mathematical dexterity is a focus, particularly in the writing of proofs and creative problem-solving. Applications are used throughout to illustrate concepts.

MA410: Calculus I

Full Year: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Precalculus or Foundations in Precalculus

This course provides students with an intuitive approach to the fundamentals of differential calculus. Students explore limits, leading to the definition of derivative. The concepts of average and instantaneous rate of change are investigated. We develop the rules of differentiation, including the chain rule and implicit differentiation, and apply them to problems in optimization, related rates and curve sketching. We will expand upon the differential calculus to introduce the concepts of finding area under a curve, the integral regarded as the antiderivative and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will learn multiple techniques for integration, including substitution. Definite and indefinite integrals are used to explore applications such as distance, area, and volumes of solids of revolution.

MA410: Statistics

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Precalculus, Foundations in Precalculus or permission of the Department Head.

Statistics is the science and art of learning from data to understand our uncertain world. We find statistics everywhere in daily life, from climate change and presidential polls to sports and the development of new medicines. In this yearlong course, students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data (describing patterns and departures from patterns), Sampling and Experimentation (planning and conducting a study), Anticipating Patterns (exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation), and Statistical Inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). Students participate in several projects. Students also will use data analysis software to model statistical problems.

MA450: Statistics Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Precalculus Honors or grade of High Honors in Precalculus.

This is a rigorous course for students of demonstrated ability who have the desire and capability to learn and work independently and to think creatively. The entire content of Statistics will be covered in greater depth. In this Honors course, students will learn about four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data (describing patterns and departures from patterns), Sampling and Experimentation (planning and conducting a study), Anticipating Patterns (exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation), and Statistical Inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). Students will participate in several projects to analyze current issues. To develop effective statistical communication skills, students will be required to prepare frequent writ-ten and oral analyses of real data. Statistics Honors is the high school equivalent of an introductory college statistics course and students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. This course also prepares students for further study of statistics in science, economics, sociology, psychology, medicine, math, engineering, political science, geography, business, education and more.

MA450: Calculus I Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Precalculus Honors or Grade of High Honors in Precalculus.

This course is suitable for those students with demonstrated ability and interest in mathematics. A solid working knowledge of algebra, geometry and precalculus is necessary. The course builds a solid conceptual understanding of calculus with a focus on proofs. Topics include limits, continuity and differentiation techniques of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications of differentiation include solving optimization problems and related rate problems, curve sketching, and the relationship of position, velocity, and acceleration. Antidifferentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus are introduced. Techniques include integration by substitution, integration by parts and trigonometric substitutions. Definite and indefinite integrals are used to explore applications such as distance, area and volumes of solids of revolution. Solutions of simple differential equations are obtained analytically and by using slope fields and Euler’s method. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to take the AB level of the Advanced Placement examination in calculus in May.

MA460: Calculus II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Grade of Honors or higher in Calculus I Honors.

This course is a continuation of the study of calculus begun in Calculus 1 Honors. Students extend their techniques of integration, solve first order separable differential equations and learn how to calculate arc length and surface area. Connections between calculus and other disciplines are studied while also extending differentiation and integration techniques to polar and parametric functions. An in-depth study of sequences and series includes various tests for convergence and representation of well-known functions expressed as Taylor and Maclaurin series. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to take the BC level of the Advanced Placement examination in calculus in May.

M480: Calculus I - II Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Grade of High Honors or higher in Precalculus Honors.

This course is designed for the highly motivated mathematics student. Students develop a rigorous, comprehensive study of the concepts and techniques of calculus through a study of theorems, their proofs and applications. Topics include limits, continuity and differentiation techniques, applications of differentiation and an introduction to antidifferentiation. Applications of differentiation include solving optimization problems and related-rate problems, curve sketching, and the relationships among position, velocity and acceleration. Techniques include integration by parts, trigonometric substitutions and partial fractions. Applications of integration include area, volumes, arc length and distance. Solutions of simple differential equations are obtained analytically and using slope fields and Euler’s method. An in-depth study of sequences and series includes various tests for convergence, and representation of well-known functions expressed as Taylor and MacLaurin series. Techniques of calculus are applied to parametric and polar equations. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to take the BC level of the Advanced Placement examination in calculus in May.

MA570: Multivariable Calculus Honors

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Calculus I-II Honors or Calculus II Honors.

Applications of mathematics in physical and social sciences, economics and statistics often involve multiple variables. This course extends the ideas of single-variable calculus to multivariable situations. Students learn to use vectors, partial derivatives and multiple integrals to solve complex, multi-concept problems. Students also will investigate elements of mathematical reasoning to develop proof-writing skills.The use of mathematical graphing software is integrated throughout the course, along with the use of LaTeX to elevate the presentation of the mathematics. The course culminates with two-dimensional vector calculus and Green’s Theorem, with exploration of three-dimensional vector calculus as time permits.

MA590: Mathematics Seminar Honors

Fall, Winter or Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Multivariable Calculus or co-enrollment in Multivariable Calculus.

Mathematics Seminar Honors is designed to introduce students to post-calculus mathematics. The content of each term is independent of the content of previous terms, and will depend on the interests of the faculty and students. Recent syllabi have included: group theory, representation theory and their applications to chemistry; cryptography with an emphasis on number theory and linear algebra; writing and analyzing proofs while exploring topics such as equivalence relations; and the cardinality of infinite sets.

THE SCIENCES

Physics/Astronomy Courses

PH110: Physics First

Full Year: 3 credits

Physics First is designed for all entering Third Form students and forms the first of a three-year foundation series. Classical studies of motion, forces, energy, electricity, magnetism, and sound and light are coordinated with the impact that such knowledge has had in defining the modern technological world. Students explore the beauty and simplicity of the fundamental laws that explain our universe. Since experimentation is key to all science, great emphasis is placed on laboratory work. In the Fall Term, students focus on Newton’s Laws, momentum and energy, and the interplay between forces and their impact on linear motion. Students are encouraged to ask questions and create projects to seek answers while learning to work together in small groups, allowing for the free flow of creative ideas. In the Winter Term the course progresses to circular motion, force, motion, vibrations, waves and electrostatics. Spring Term finds students venturing into the study of electromagnetic fields, electrical circuits, motors, generators, light and optics. The final assessment in Physics First is a group project based on real-life applications of a physical problem, with a formal poster presentation and peer review.

PH310: Physics

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Co-enrollement in Algebra 2 or Higher.

[This course is intended for students who matriculate to SPS after Third Form year and is not avail-able to those who have completed Physics First.]

Students investigate the physical world using both traditional and computer-based data acquisition and analysis. This course introduces students to the major topic areas of physics, focusing on conceptual understanding and analytical problem-solving techniques. Extensive laboratory explorations, performed in small groups, are used to introduce concepts that are then reinforced through discussion and problem work. Incorporating a more mathematical approach than Physics First, Physics begins with the study of mechanics, including uniform motion, Newton’s Laws, momentum, energy, circular motion and gravitation. This is followed by electrostatics, magnetism, DC circuits and wave motion, including resonance, sound and wave optics. The Spring Term concludes with the study of ray optics as students experiment with mirrors and lenses and more complex optical devices. A working knowledge of algebra is assumed.

PH350: Honors Physics

Full Year: 3 credits

[This course is not available to students who have completed Physics First.]

FALL TERM: Mechanics. An accelerated introduction to Newtonian mechanics for students with strong math backgrounds who are seeking a deeper understanding of their physical world. Topics include linear and projectile motion, New-ton’s Laws, energy and momentum. Laboratory exercises and classroom demonstrations are used throughout the course to solidify conceptualization and instill respect for data. Concepts also are strengthened through work in group tutorials developed specifically for students at this level as well as student-driven projects at the conclusion of the term.

WINTER TERM: Electricity and magnetism. An accelerated introduction to electricity and magnetism for students with strong math backgrounds who are seeking a deeper understanding of their physical world. Topics include electrostatics, circuits, magnetism and electromagnetic induction. Laboratory exercises and classroom demonstrations are used throughout the course to solidify conceptualization and instill respect for data. Concepts also are strengthened through work in group tutorials developed specifically for students at this level as well as student-driven projects at the conclusion of the term.

SPRING TERM: Extended topics. An accelerated introduction to non-linear physical motion for students with strong math backgrounds who are seeking a deeper understanding of their physical world. Topics will build off of the previous terms of Honors Physics and will include rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, waves and light. Laboratory exercises and classroom demonstrations are used throughout the course to solidify conceptualization and instill respect for data. Concepts also are strengthened through work in group tutorials developed specifically for students at this level as well as student-driven projects at the conclusion of the term.

PH410: Physics II: Light and Optics

Fall Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of a year-long physics course.

Students will investigate the phenomenon of light as both a particle and a wave. They will build on their previous understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum to examine topics including wave interference, diffraction and optics. Through hands-on inquiry experiences, data collection experiments and project-based learning, students will learn through a variety of teaching and learning techniques.

PH410: Physics II: Fluid and Thermodynamics

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of a year-long physics course.

Students will investigate the physics of fluids and heat. They will build on their previous understanding of the waves and heat to examine topics including pressure-volume-temperature relationships in fluids, the laws of thermodynamics and the methods of heat transfer. Through hands-on inquiry experiences, data collection experiments and project-based learning, students will learn through a variety of teaching and learning techniques.

PH410: Physics II: Subatomic, Quantum and Relativity

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of a year-long physics course.

Students will investigate a few of the branches of modern physics. They will build on their previous understanding of physics to examine the areas of subatomic physics, quantum physics and special and general relativity. Through hands-on inquiry experiences, data collection experiments and project-based learning, students will learn through a variety of teaching and learning techniques.

PH490: Advanced Physics

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Successful completion of a full year of physics and a full year of calculus.

This is a college-level course that relies heavily on the use of calculus and builds on the concepts developed in Physics First, Physics or Honors Physics, going into greater depth and detail. We will study Newtonian mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves and oscillations and a few topics in modern physics if time permits. Laboratory exercises and classroom demonstrations are used throughout the course to solidify conceptualization, build theoretical modeling skills, develop explanations and instill respect for data. Computer programs (such as Excel and Python) are used for data analysis, mathematical modeling and numerical integration. Students develop writing skills to produce journal-quality lab reports. Students who successfully complete this course are prepared to take the AP Physics C: Mechanics and the AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism Advanced Placement examinations in May.

AS210: Introduction to Astronomy

Fall or Spring Term: 1 credit

This is a one-term course designed to give students an introduction to observational astronomy. In the classroom, the basic principles of astronomy are taught, including the layout of the heavens, a study of the solar system, a history of astronomy and the basic principles of telescopes. At the Hawley Observatory, students work independently at least one clear night a week learning the constellations, phases of the moon and how to use a telescope to find objects that are invisible to the naked eye. Upon completion of this course, students are encouraged to take Stellar Astronomy and Galactic Astronomy.

AS310: Stellar Astronomy

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Introduction to Astronomy

This course builds upon the Introduction to Astronomy course and is focused upon the nature of stars in our universe as we know it. Students will study the makeup and activity of our Sun; how astronomers use spectra to determine the properties and components of stars; the evolution of low- and high-mass stars; and the spectacular stellar deaths of supernovae and black holes. Students also are encouraged to take Galactic Astronomy, though Stellar Astronomy is not a prerequisite.

AS310: Galactic Astronomy

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Introduction to Astronomy

This course builds upon the Introduction to Astronomy course and is focused upon the nature of galaxies in our universe as we know it. Students will study the formation and structure of the Milky Way and other galaxies; how astronomers use observations across the electromagnetic spectrum to learn about galaxies; the evolution of large-scale structure, including as it relates to dark matter; and the birth and death of the universe, including the Big Bang and the effects of dark energy. Students also are encouraged to take Stellar Astronomy, though that is not a prerequisite for this course.

 

Chemistry Courses

CH210: Chemistry

Full Year: 3 credits

Chemistry is the second course in the three-year foundational series. This course emphasizes scientific observation and investigation. Chemical principles and concepts are introduced through laboratory experiments and are expanded in lecture and class discussion. Students learn to observe, question, test, problem-solve and draw conclusions. Selected experiments require both cooperative and individual investigation. Topics include properties of matter, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solutions, gases, thermochemistry, equilibria, acids and bases, and oxidation-reduction. This course is taken prior to taking Biology.

CH250: Honors Chemistry

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Co-enrollment in Algebra 2 Honors or higher and recommendation from Physics First teacher.

Honors Chemistry is the second course in the three-year foundational series. This course is an introductory chemistry course that will cover an expanded curriculum of Chemistry. The final grade in Honors Chemistry will consist of the term work, cumulative exams and lab practical. Topics include properties of matter, bonding, chemical periodicity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, and oxidation-reduction.

CH410: Chemistry II: Quantitative Analysis

Fall Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: One year of chemistry. Not open to students who have taken Advanced Chemistry.

This term-long chemistry course is designed for students who would like to continue on in chemistry, but are not interested in taking the yearlong Advanced Chemistry course. In this laboratory-based course, students will study various methods of quantitative analysis, including titration, gravimetric analysis and spectrophotometry to gain a better understanding of analytical chemistry. These concepts apply to the real world in pharmaceutical, food, chemical and agriculture industries — businesses that use chemistry to measure product quality before releasing it to consumers.

CH410: Chemistry II: Reaction Rates and Equilibrium

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: One Year of Chemistry. Not open to students who have taken Advanced Chemistry.

This term-long chemistry course is designed for students who would like to continue on in chemistry, but are not interested in taking the yearlong Advanced Chemistry course. This course expands on the basic knowledge of reaction rates and equilibrium developed in first-year chemistry. Through experimentation, students will be introduced to rate laws and mechanisms as well as special applications of equilibrium including buffer solutions and solubility equilibria. These concepts apply to our bodies everyday when biochemical reactions occur at just the correct rate and pH is delicately equilibrated in our blood in order to maintain homeostasis.

CH480: Advanced Chemistry

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: Successful completion of a full year of Chemistry with a grade of High Honors or a full year of Honors Chemistry with a grade of Honors or better.

Intended for those students who desire a more challenging study of chemistry, this advanced course parallels that of a college chemistry course and prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in chemistry. The course builds on the concepts developed in Chemistry or Honors Chemistry, going into greater depth and detail. The course challenges students in the laboratory and emphasizes cooperative learning through problem-solving and laboratory investigations. Areas of study in the Fall Term include a review of stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular geometry, and properties of matter including gas laws, intermolecular forces and solutions. The laboratory portion of Advanced Chemistry is designed to introduce students to the techniques used in analytical chemistry.

Areas of study in the Winter Term include kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, solubility equilibria and thermochemistry. Students are expected to refine their analytical techniques in the laboratory.

Areas of study in the Spring Term include oxidation-reduction and thermochemistry. The Fall and Winter Terms are reviewed to assist students in preparing for the Advanced Placement examination in chemistry. The year in Advanced Chemistry culminates in independent research projects on topics of the students’ choosing.

Biology Courses

BI310: Biology

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: One year of physics and one year of chemistry.

Biology is the third course in the three-year foundational series. Biology is designed to build on the physics and chemistry knowledge base while developing an inquiring point of view toward living systems in the context of a changing environment. Laboratory experiments heighten and integrate events at the molecular, cellular and population levels of organization. Specific topics include cell structure and function, biochemical mechanisms, genetics, evolution, systems and ecology. Scientific thinking and communication are emphasized throughout the course.

BI310: Embryology

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completed or co-enrolled in Biology.

This course offers students an introduction to comparative embryology — the study of different embryos and developmental stages. In this course, students will learn the basic terminology of embryology while also observing and studying the developmental process in several invertebrate and vertebrate models. Also, students will be introduced to the concept of how evolutionary changes in genes can affect phenotype, in turn resulting in certain similarities and differences of the developmental characters of different embryos. In the integrated lab sections of this class, students will have hands-on opportunities to examine different stages of early embryonic development in both vertebrate (chick) and invertebrate (nematode) embryos. Students will compare and contrast the development of these embryos with human embryonic development and how each of these species are related evolutionarily. They also will learn about a few real-life teratogens that affect human embryonic development. Upon completion of this class, students will have the basic toolkit to appreciate and understand how the development of one species can shed light on how it has evolved relative to development of other species

BI310: Evolutionary Biology

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: One year of biology  and one year of chemistry.

Evolution is a fundamental component of our understanding of life, underlying all other concepts that we study in life science. Students will explore how evolution occurs, the evidence that supports our understanding of evolution and where we are witnessing evolution today. The course will examine the work of several scientists in the field and how that work fits together informing our current understanding of evolution. Students will learn about both microevolution and macroevolution through historical and current examples. Students will apply these concepts to current applications of evolution in today’s world.

BI450: Advanced Biology: Human Anatomy & Physiology

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisites: One year of biology and one year of chemistry.

This is a full-year, upper-level biology course designed to provide an understanding of the structure and function of the major human organ systems. Topics of study include neuroendocrine homeostatic control mechanisms and the muscu-loskeletal, cardiorespiratory, digestive, immune, renal and reproductive systems. Disease states and adaptive physiological responses to stress, exercise and nutrient intake are considered throughout the course. Laboratory activities include micros-copy, organ and cat dissections, case studies and evaluation of human physiological responses. Scientific thinking and communication are emphasized throughout the course.

BI450: Advanced Biology: Molecular Biology

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisites: One year of biology and one year of chemistry.

This is an upper-level biology course designed to build a strong foundation in biochemistry and molecular biology upon which students apply their knowledge to trending areas in the field. During the Fall Term, students study topics including essential biochemistry, the central dogma of molecular genetics, DNA error and repair, molecular evolution and the origins of life, aging and cellular senescence. The Winter Term of Molecular Biology covers a variety of hot topics including epigenetics and cancer. Students have the opportunity to collectively select the topics they study at the end of the Winter and Spring Terms, selecting from infectious disease, stem cell and developmental biology, neurobiology and opioids, gene editing, and more. Students investigate topics by mastering molecular laboratory techniques such as aseptic technique, DNA purification, PCR and gene sequencing. Stu-dents also examine the genetics and treatment of cancer through cell culture experiments while developing and refining their molecular techniques. Throughout, students will develop important skills, including reading and writing scientific journal articles, presenting in a formal scientific manner, breaking down molecular mechanisms and applying their content knowledge to novel situations. During the Spring Term, students identify a question they want to investigate and design a research plan based on the techniques they have mastered over the course of the year. The class reviews the proposals and a few projects are selected and carried out based on merit, feasibility and interest. The project concludes with a finished manuscript that follows the guidelines of a peer-reviewed journal.

BI450: ADVANCED BIOLOGY: EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY: METABOLIC, CARDIOVASCULAR AND NEUROMUSCULAR ADAPTATION

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: One Year of biology and one year of chemistry.

[Students taking our full-year Human Anatomy and Physiology course should not enroll in this course.]

In the Fall Term, students investigate the biochemistry, digestion and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates and fats. Exploration of the interaction between nutrition and exercise on health, disease, fitness training and athletic performance is emphasized. Laboratory investigations include anatomical dissections, biochemical analysis of foods, dietary assessments and evaluation of metabolic rate during rest and exercise.

Students begin the Winter Term by investigating normal cardiorespiratory function and health. This is followed by an exploration of the cardio-respiratory responses to acute exercise, as well as the physiological adaptations to chronic exercise (training) and selected stressors such as high-altitude training, aging and disease. Laboratory investigations include anatomical dissections, blood pressure, electrocardiogram and pulmonary analyses, and treadmill measurements of oxygen consumption (VO2) and anaerobic threshold.

During Spring Term, students investigate how skeletal muscle develops and functions. This is followed by an exploration of the neuromuscular responses and physiological adaptations to chronic exercise (resistance training) and selected stressors, including use of muscle-building aids and supplements, as well changes in muscle physiology with aging and disease states. Laboratory investigations include anatomical dissections, muscle metabolism and fiber type assessment, and measurements of muscular strength, endurance and flexibility. Students will investigate, evaluate and compare reports of muscle physiology changes presented in the popular press with research published in scientific literature. During all terms, students will read original research, design experiments to ad-dress their own physiological questions and report findings in end-of-term presentations.

BI450: Advanced Biology: Enviornmental Science

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: One year of biology and one year of chemistry.

Students will be introduced to the basic concepts that inform issues in environmental science. In the Fall, we will deal with core concepts that include an introduction to geology and a review of basic biology and chemistry through the field of biogeochemistry. The term will end with an introduction to soil biology and environmental issues related to agriculture. During Winter Term, students will focus on human aspects of environmental science. The term will begin with a discussion of the ecological consequences of human overpopulation. From here, we will move toward aligning economic theory with sustainable development on a local, national and global scale. In the Spring Term, students will use their knowledge of sustainable development to discuss the social, technical and ecological aspects of energy development and us-age on a global scale. As the snow melts, we return to a local perspective and explore the land-use history at St. Paul’s School and the New England region. We will move from this historic perspective to a more modern look at forestry and land use practices throughout the region. We end the year looking at the major causes and consequences of climate change while students design and conduct independent research projects that integrate the major themes of the course.

BI450: Advanced Biology: Marine Biology

Full Year: 3 credits

Prerequisite: One year of biology and one year of chemistry.

This year-long advanced science course investigates the fresh and saltwater ecology of the world’s watery biomes. During the Fall Term, using the natural resources of our campus, students will examine the different aquatic habitats that are inherent to New Hampshire by studying energy flow, nutrient cycling, pollution and ecosystem stability in our own lakes, ponds and streams. The Winter portion of this course examines the open ocean in all its vastness, depth and power. Creatures of the open ocean, including marine mammals and deep-sea inhabitants, will be at the heart of the term’s study. Mammalian diving physiology, sharks, skates and rays also will be an important part of our studies. During the Spring Term, our course examines the marine environments closer to shore, including coral reefs, mangroves, estuaries and rocky coastlines. Students will learn how to identify fish, study the interconnectedness of the sea and the land and investigate the complex relationships found in each of these biomes. Human influence and fisheries management will be major themes throughout the year. Students enrolled in Marine Biology will have the unique opportunity to participate in a multi-day field trip to Marine Lab in Key Largo, Florida or The Island School in Eleuthera, Bahamas. Both trips include a hands-on study of coral reefs, mangroves and saltwater ecosystems along with an in-depth look at the sustainability of our natural aquatic resources.

Computer Science/Engineering Courses

AI210: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Fall Term: 1 credit

In this course, classical artificial intelligence topics such as knowledge representation, search algorithms, and learning expert systems are explored. Students study the possibilities for understanding language, thought and consciousness. Students also learn the basics of programming and become proficient at developing recursive problem-solving and search programs.

SC210: Computer Programming Using Arduino-C

Fall or Spring Term: 1 credit

This course introduces students to the foundations of programming and robotics using the Arduino-C language and embedded controllers. Code written from scratch is used to control real-world objects such as LEDs, lasers, buzzers, audio transducers, buttons, motors, grippers, environmental sensors, LCD screens and computer keyboards. Programming topics include computer mathematics, functions, loops, logic gates, input/output communications, timers and random numbers. (Students who have taken Physics First will be familiar with some of these topics, as they were incorporated in the class beginning with the 20:20:-20:21 academic year.

Students also are exposed to building basic electronic circuits and using CAD software to create designs that are then 3D printed and laser cut in the lab. Students apply what they learn in projects of their own choosing during the final weeks of the course.

After students complete this course, they will be ready to take Physical Computing and Robotics.

SC310: Physical Computing and Robotics

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Computer Programming using Arduino-C or Computer Programming using Java or Permission of the Science Department.

The focus of this course is mobile robotics. Students will build upon their coding foundations by learning to control small two-wheeled robots and other physical devices such as relays, actuators and a wide range of input devices and sensors. Stu-dents also are introduced to electronics, circuits, soldering and 3D design and fabrication. Students will have time and freedom to create, build and program several robotic applications that will perform routine and autonomous tasks, usually incorporating basic feedback control systems. Applications may include robotic dance, line-following robots, obstacle avoidance, tabletop navigation, maze navigation, robot soccer, remote controlled robotics, facial expressive robotics and robotic art.

Students spend much of the course designing, building and coding robotic projects of their own choosing. Collaborative team-building skills also will be developed. The language used in this course is Arduino-C, and the Teensy 3.2 microcontroller is used to provide an easy interface between the virtual and real worlds.

SC410: Autonomous Data Collection and Sensor Design

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Physical Computing and Robotics or Computational Thinking.

This is an applied science course for students who, due to the independent nature of the course, are self-motivated and understand desktop programming and/or microcontroller programming. The focus of this advanced course is sensor design and data collection techniques for scientific as well as everyday purposes. This self-directed course is project-oriented and driven largely by student interests. Building upon their previous coding and possibly physical computing experiences, students will use non-proprietary and student-made sensors to collect data on a wide array of phenomena. What will be measured will largely depend on student interest but may include data for an experiment in an SPS science class, atmospheric data collected from a drone or model rocket, in situ environmental measurements of one of the many local bodies of water or long-duration arrayed temperature measurements of one of the campus buildings. Real-time clocks will be used to ensure accurate data collection and flash memory modules will be used to store large amounts of data. Computer aided design (CAD), 3D design, mechanical engineering, electronic circuit design and printed circuit board (PCB) fabrication are other possible aspects of the course. Collaborative team-building skills will be developed. Students in this course will be expected to work independently on projects of their own choosing.

SC210: Computer Programming Using Java

Fall Term: 1 credit

This course is the first course in a three-term sequence. We will explore the fundamentals of programming using Java. Topics covered will include loops, methods, strings, computer number systems, conditionals, logic gates and parameters. Students will solve a variety of problems through programming and written work. After students complete this course, they will be ready to take Computational Thinking.

SC310: Computational Thinking

Winter Term: 1 credit

 Prerequisite: Computer Programming using Java OR Computer Programming using Arduino-C or permission of the Science Department 

We will explore the fundamentals of object-oriented programming using Java. Topics covered will include the construction of classes, creating objects, object encapsulation, arrays, array lists and recursion. The course stresses the understanding of problem solving in terms of algorithmic development. After students complete this course, they will be ready to take Advanced Programming in Java.

SC410: Advanced Programming in Java

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Computational Thinking

[This course is the third in a three-term sequence]

This course allows students to write and examine more complex programs consisting of multiple classes. Topics covered will include interfaces, inheritance, polymorphism, recursion, searching and sorting. The course stresses the understanding of problem solving in terms of efficient algorithmic development. Upon the completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement CS-A exam.

SC310: Competitions, Hackathons, and a Martion Rover Simulator

Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Computer Programming using Arduino-C or Computer Programming using Java or permission of the Science Department

This open-ended course will give students the time and expertise to prepare for external and in-house competitions and hackathons. This is a self-directed course that is project-oriented and driven largely by student interests. Competitions may include desktop programming contests, a Martian rover simulator, robot dance, robot line-following, robot sumo wrestling, robot maze navigation, robot soccer and robot firefighting. For competitions, the objectives are well-known ahead of time and students are expected to show up with a working robot. For hackathons, no prior preparation is necessary, and students learn about the problem(s) to be solved at the start of the event, which may last from a few hours to 1-2 days. Additionally, interested students will have the opportunity to design and create competitions of their own making. Collaborative team-building skills also will be developed. Students in this course will be expected to work independently on competitions of their own choosing.

SC310: Projects in Robotics and Computer Science

Fall and Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Computer Programming using Ardu-ino-C or Computer Programming using Java or permission of the Science Department.

This is an applied science course for students who, due to the independent nature of the course, are self-motivated and have a deep understanding of desktop programming and/or microcontroller programming. This self-directed course is project-oriented and driven solely by student interests. Building upon their previous coding and possibly physical computing experiences, students will design, build and write code for one or more projects of their own choosing. These may be applications in desktop computing, autonomous robotics, physical computing, machine learning or other computer-related disciplines. Projects will often solve societal problems or fill a gap in some aspect of everyday living. While this is not an engineering class, computer aided design (CAD), 3D design, mechanical engineering, electronic circuit design and printed circuit board (PCB) fabrication may be employed in the student-directed projects. Collaborative team-building skills also will be developed. Students in this course will be expected to work independently throughout the term. Students will show off their finished projects to the SPS community at the end of the term.

SC410: Advanced Projects in Robotics and Computer Science

Fall and Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Physical Computing and Robotics or Computational Thinking.

This is an applied science course for students who, due to the independent nature of the course, are self-motivated and have a deep understanding of desktop programming and/or microcontroller programming. This self-directed course is project-oriented and driven solely by student interests; students will work at the advanced level on these types of projects. Building upon their previous coding and possibly physical computing experiences, students will design, build and write code for one or more projects of their own choosing. These may be applications in desktop computing, autonomous robotics, physical computing, machine learning or other computer-related disciplines. Projects will often solve societal problems or fill a gap in some aspect of everyday living. While this is not an engineering class, computer aided design (CAD), 3D design, mechanical engineering, electronic circuit design and printed circuit board (PCB) fabrication may be employed in the student-directed projects. Collaborative team-building skills also will be developed. Students in this course will be expected to work independently throughout the term. Students will show off their finished projects to the SPS community at the end of the term.

SC210: Engineering Design

Fall or Winter Term: 1 credit

Students will learn about the engineering design process through the completion of three major projects as well as shorter group projects. The initial project involves designing and building a game out of wood, and then modeling it using a variety of CAD software options. Final designs are 3-D printed. The second project involves groups creating VEX robots designed to solve the annual VEX Robotics Challenge. Finally groups of students must design a sea perch-style underwater autonomous vehicle for a final competition in the School’s pool. Through these projects students will learn and practice problem-brainstorming techniques and best-practices for successful group work. Students will use the MIT 2.0:0:7 Design and Manufacturing Course notes to learn about deterministic design and basic machine components.

SC210: USFIRST Robotics Engineering Team

Winter Term: 1 credit

The students in this class are part of the St. Paul’s School Team 1512 FIRST Robotics team. The objective of this course is to engage students in a challenging problem that allows them to put their groupwork and deterministic-design techniques learned in the Fall into practice. Near the start of the Winter Term, specifications for the international FIRST Robotics competition will be received and studied. In January, the students will travel to the kickoff event in Manchester to learn about the new challenge. The remainder of the Winter Term will be spent designing, manufacturing and programming the team’s entry. At the end of the Winter Term, the team will enter its robot in various regional competitions. Essential to the course will be the completion of periodic self-reflection journals that allow the students to reassess and re-fine their problem-solving and engineering-design techniques. At the end of the competitions, our students are required to write a final journal where they critically evaluate all the design solutions they saw at the competition.

Based on student interest and scheduling, students in this course also are able to enter and attend local VEX Robotics competitions.

Note: This course can be taken multiple times, in order to broaden a student’s experience at solving problems using the engineering-design process. Students taking the course a second time are expected to work on more advanced projects and serve as teachers/mentors to the new students.

SC230: Engineering Projects

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Engineering Design or USFIRST Robotics.

The Spring Term course allows students to work on large-scale engineering projects to further their understanding of the engineering design process. Students can propose software or hardware design projects.

SC490: Applied Science and Engineering Capstone

Fall and Winter Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the Applied Science and Engineering Program Seminar and an externship the summer between their Fifth and Sixth Form years.

[Fall Term is required for all students in the Applied Science and Engineering Program.]

The Applied Science and Engineering Program experience culminates in a Sixth Form science capstone project based on the student’s externship research. Over the summer, students coordinate with their organization and their assigned St. Paul’s faculty mentor to determine a capstone project that is both rigorous and feasible. Students complete a capstone proposal that outlines their project before they return to school in the Fall. Upon their return to campus, students carry out their capstone projects under the supervision of the Applied Science and Engineering Faculty. Students present their progress at weekly lab meetings and receive feedback from program mentors and other students. Students also get the opportunity to share their summer and capstone research with the school community.

SC480: Applied Science and Engineering Seminar

Spring Term: 1 credit

This course is the first in the Applied Science and Engineering Program. Students interested in the Program should register for this course during the course-selection process in the Spring of their Fourth Form year. During the Fall and Winter Terms of their Fifth Form year, students must complete the non-credit Applied Science and Engineering Prep Seminar. In addition, students must secure a summer externship before the end of the Winter Term of their Fifth Form year and must be selected by the Applied Science and Engineering Commit-tee in order to enroll in this course

Prerequisites depend on the type of externship:

  • BIOLOGY: Chemistry and either completion or current enrollment in Biology.
  • ENGINEERING: Conceptual Physics or Chemistry and at least one Engineering course.
  • COMPUTER SCIENCE: Conceptual Physics or Chemistry and at least one Computer Science or Artificial Intelligence course.
  • OTHERS: Prerequisites depend on field of interest (Determined by the Director).

In the Applied Science and Engineering Program Seminar, students will work to prepare for their externships. They will complete a variety of projects throughout the Spring Term that will help them develop skills necessary for their summer externships. All students will complete research to become more familiar with the topics relevant to their summer experience. Biology students will learn a variety of molecular laboratory techniques as well as reading scientific journal articles provided by their labs. Engineering and Computer Science students will master a relevant programming language, complete machine shop and CAD techniques and learn a variety of relevant software, such as MATLAB. Students in other fields will be as-signed relevant tasks in accordance with their field of interest. In addition, students learn important lessons about how to act in the lab environment and how to interact with colleagues in preparation for their summer experience

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Inderdisciplinary Courses

IS410: History of Illustrated Narratives.

Fall Term: 1 credit

[Does not fufill the arts graduation requirement.]

This course explores the history of storytelling through the structure of the “book” and its conceptual iterations. Analysis of historical creative work begins with codices from ancient Greece and Rome, leading up to learning writing and record-keeping practices of non-Western traditions from Asia, Africa and the Americas. In addition to learning the historical traditions of narrative and storytelling, students also will read contemporary illustrated narratives including graphic novels, comics, ephemera and digital media. This course offering is designed for those who have no experience or confidence in their artistic abilities, while at the same time allowing students in advanced-level art courses to explore their work through new and different perspectives/processes. Projects are based on studying actual works of art, slide studies, online research and class discussions. Students practice studio techniques such as book binding, papermaking, painting, creating ink from raw materials and multiple printing processes.

IS410: Post-modern (1950) to the Present — Studio Art History Seminar

Winter Term: 1 credit

[Does not fulfill the arts graduation requirement.]

This course explores major art historical movements after World War II leading up to contemporary art practices at the turn of the 21st century. Taught in conjunction with the SPS gallery and collection, students study the history and techniques of various artists through research, visual analysis and studio projects. Historical focus is on the reinvention of traditional studio media and adapting them into the digital age. Movements studied include feminist art, conceptual art, performance art, diasporic art and the many facets of high- and low-brow art. Students will hear and learn from contemporary artists and educators through video lectures and writings. A heavy emphasis is placed on building observational skills and visual analysis of major works of art. This course offering is designed for those who have no experience or confidence in their artistic abilities, while at the same time allowing students in advanced-level art courses to explore their work through new and different media.

IS410: The Science of Mindfullness and Meditative Practice

Winter Term: 1 credit

This interdisciplinary course explores the spiritual, psychological and medical aspects and benefits of mindfulness/meditation. The course includes research-based inquiry into case studies as well as the neurology behind the amazing benefits of mindfulness/meditation. Students will spend one day per week actually practicing. We will shift from mindfulness-based activities to guided and silent meditation from week to week. We will have at least two guest speakers from the psychosocial and medical fields. The major assessment occurs during the last two weeks of the course, when each student will present a case study in which subjects used mindfulness to overcome various spiritual, psychological and/or medical challenges. Ongoing assessment will include weekly journal entries, participation and student-led discussions based on the topic for each week

IS410: Art History: Museum and Curatorial Studies

Spring Term: 1 credit

[Does not fulfill the arts graduation requirement.]

Using the Crumpacker Gallery as a classroom, this course explores what is required for the collecting, handling, cataloging and exhibiting of art. Students work with the gallery director and staff as they learn the various tasks needed to curate an exhibit. The St. Paul’s School permanent collection is an important resource and teaching tool in this course. Visits to nearby museums and galleries to view exhibits and to meet with gallery directors and curators are scheduled throughout the term. Students work in the gallery lab/studios to explore techniques of restoration and presentation. A close study of contemporary art and artists will be the basis for our studies.

IS410: Food, Enviornment and Society

Spring Term: 1 credit

How people produce, obtain and prepare their food says something important about their values, health and relationship to the land. In this course, students will investigate the typical modern “Western” diet, how it is produced, and what these things say about society and ourselves. Students will meet farmers and chefs, prepare and share food and get their hands dirty. The course focuses on the particular impacts food has on the climate and opportunities for positive action. It considers the historical developments in agriculture and examines the science of agriculture, ingredients and cuisine as well as the practices of farmers and advocates working to improve our food system. The course draws on a variety of sources, from poetry to non-fiction novels to scientific literature. Ultimately, students will consider and answer for themselves: If we are what we eat, then what are we?

IS410: In Tune With Nature: A literary and Scientific Study of the Natural World

Spring Term: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of, or current enrollment in, biology.

This course will be a literary and scientific study of the natural world. Looking closely at the natural world around us, journaling about our own observations and conducting scientific field studies are the essentials of this course as we read and discuss the work of a number of nature writers to help inspire our own writing and reflection. How can we learn to become more environmentally aware through our close observations, labwork, reading and discussions about nature? What defines celebrated nature writers and why are they such accomplished writers? How do we model that in our own writing? Students will complete a final project exploring an ecological issue of interest to them, including interviewing a professional in the field and proposing a possible solution or solutions.